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* Tribute - National Memorial to the Soviet Armed Partisans in Belgium -Rebecq, Sunday May 9th, 2021 *

* The Newsletter: issue Marsh 2021 *

The RAF Squadrons involved in WW2 in Belgium



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Squadron 451 to 500

Click to go on the right squadron
451 Squadron
452 Squadron
458 Squadron
460 Squadron
462 Squadron
463 Squadron
464 Squadron
466 Squadron
467 Squadron
485 Squadron
487 Squadron
500 Squadron
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cest raf squadron

451 Squadron

No. 451 Squadron was a Royal Australian Air Force army cooperation and fighter squadron of World War II. It was formed at Bankstown, New South Wales, on 12 February 1941 and began flying operations on 1 July as part of the North African Campaign in Egypt and Libya. No. 451 Squadron was withdrawn for refitting in early January 1942 and spent the remainder of the year performing garrison duties in Syria. In January 1943, it was transferred to Egypt to contribute to local air defence but saw almost no combat. This inactivity caused morale among the squadron's personnel to greatly deteriorate.
The squadron returned to combat in April 1944 when, operating from bases in Corsica, it took part in the Italian Campaign and Allied invasion of Southern France until September. No. 451 Squadron moved to Italy between September and October 1944, but was transferred to the United Kingdom in November. From January to April 1945, it took part in the liberation of Europe by escorting Allied bomber units and conducting air strikes against German V-2 rocket sites and transportation targets. Following the war, the squadron was deployed to Germany from September 1945 as part of the Allied occupation forces, but was disbanded on 21 January 1946 when the Australian Government dropped plans for a permanent Australian contribution to the occupation of Germany due to a shortage of volunteers for this duty.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in witch the 451 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Spitfire SM333 fallen to HUndelgem on 14/01/1945

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452 Squadron

No. 452 Squadron is a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) air traffic control unit. It was established in 1941 as a fighter squadron, in accordance with Article XV of the Empire Air Training Scheme during World War II. The squadron flew Supermarine Spitfires for the entire war, initially over the United Kingdom and Nazi-occupied Europe. It was later based in Australia and the Netherlands East Indies, before being disbanded in 1945. It was re-raised in its current role in February 2011.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in witch the 452 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Spitfire AB785 fallen to Oostduinkerke on 19/08/1941

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458 Squadron

No. 458 Squadron was formed at Williamtown, New South Wales, on 8 July 1941 as an Article XV squadron under the terms of the Empire Air Training Scheme.[1] Consisting of only ground staff, the squadron departed for the United Kingdom in August to join other personnel assembled at RAF Holme-on-Spalding Moor,[7] where the squadron was officially established as No. 458 (Bomber) Squadron on 25 August 1941.[1] From the outset, the squadron drew personnel from many different countries, with many coming from Britain, Canada and New Zealand, as well as Australia...
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in witch the 458 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Wellington Z1218-FU-D fallen to Mont-sur-Marchiennes on 20/10/1941

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460 Squadron

No. 460 Squadron was formed at Molesworth, Huntingdonshire, on 15th November 1941, as a bomber squadron equipped with Wellington aircraft. Originally part of No. 8 Group, it moved and transferred to Breighton, Yorkshire, and No. 1 Group early in January 1942, and began operations on 12/13th March. In September 1942, the squadron "stood down" to re-equip with Halifaxes, but in October it began to re-arm with Lancasters instead. It was the only Australian squadron in No. 1 Group in 1942. In mid-May 1943, it moved to Binbrook, Lincolnshire, where it remained based until July 1945.
During its operational career, No. 460 Squadron attacked many major targets, including Berlin and Peenemunde, and with Lancasters logged approximately 5,700 operational sorties. One of its Lancasters, a Mark I, serialled W4783 and known as "G for George", made 90 operational sorties between 6/7th December 1942 (when it "bombed believed Mannheim" - the primary target that night) and 2Oth/21st April 1944 (when it bombed Cologne) and was subsequently presented to the Australian War Museum. It remains there to this day.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 460 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Wellington Z1404-UV-J fallen to Eisden on 13/08/1942
* Crash of Lancaster PB471-AR-F fallen to Linkhout on 12/02/1945
* Crash of Lancaster RA524-AR-V fallen in Germany on 2/03/1945
* Crash of Wellington Z1311-UV-Z fallen to Estinnes on 1/06/1942
* Crash of Wellington Z1251-UV-X fallen to Nieuwpoort on 13/03/1942
* Crash of Lancaster W4332-UV fallen off coast on 16/06/1943
* Crash of Lancaster JB598-AR-C fallen to Prüm (St-Vith) on 26/03/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LM324-UV fallen to Meeuwen on 15/06/1943 * Crash of Halifax LK865-C8-Q fallen to Hoogstraten on 28/05/1944

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462 Squadron

No. 462 Squadron is a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) squadron which forms part of the Information Warfare Directorate in the RAAF's Air Warfare Centre. The squadron was first formed in 1942 as a heavy bomber unit and saw combat in this role in the Mediterranean area until it was disbanded in March 1944. It was reformed in the United Kingdom in August 1944 to participate in the bombing campaign against Germany, and in December that year converted to a specialist electronic warfare unit. No. 462 Squadron continued in this role until the end of the European war in May 1945 and was disbanded in September that year. The squadron was reformed in its current role during April 2005...
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 462 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Lancaster MZ469-Z-5N fallen to Marche-en-Famenne on 7/01/1945
* Crash of Halifax LL599-Z5-E fallen outside the borders: Aachen on 23/10/1944
* Crash of Halifax MZ401-Z5-D fallen out of borders on 2/11/1944

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463 Squadron

No. 463 Squadron RAAF was a Royal Australian Air Force heavy bomber squadron during World War II. The squadron was formed in the United Kingdom in late 1943 from personnel and aircraft allocated from No. 467 Squadron RAAF. The squadron was equipped with Avro Lancaster bombers and flew its first raids on Germany immediately after being formed. Operating as part of RAF Bomber Command No. 463 Squadron conducted raids against cities, industrial facilities and military targets in Germany, France and Norway throughout 1944 and until the end of the war in May 1945. Following the war, the squadron evacuated Allied prisoners of war from Europe until it was disbanded in late 1945.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 463 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Lancaster LL882-JO-J fallen to Langemark on 11/05/1944

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464 Squadron

No. 464 Squadron was formed at Feltwell, Norfolk, on 1st September 1942, as a light day-bomber squadron equipped with Lockheed Ventura aircraft - nicknamed "flying pigs" because of their porcine bodies - and began operations on 6th December, when it contributed 14 Venturas to the famous low-level raid on the Philips radio and valve factory at Eindhoven. The squadron continued operations with Venturas - albeit very spasmodically - until 10th July 1943, by which time it (and its parent Group - No. 2) had transferred from Bomber Command to the Second Tactical Air Force.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 464 squadron was involved:
Crash of Mosquito HX916-SB-F fallen to Schoten on 9/10/1943
* Crash of Halifax LV919-HD-O fallen to Zondereigen on 13/05/1944
* Crash of Mosquito NT231 fallen to Heverlee on 1/01/1945
* Crash of Mosquito PZ309-SB-Z fallen to Namur on 17/02/1945

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466 Squadron

No. 466 Squadron RAAF was formed at Driffield, Yorkshire, on 15th October 1942, as a medium-bomber squadron, equipped with Wellington aircraft and under the control of No. 4 Group. It moved to Leconfield in December 1942, but returned to Driffield in June 1944, and remained based there for the rest of the European war.
Beginning operations against the enemy on 13th January 1943, with a minelaying or Gardening mission off the Frisian Islands, the squadron continued with Wellingtons until the end of August 1943, and during this period dropped 620 tons of bombs and laid 330 tons of mines. Halifax B.IIIs replaced the Wellingtons (which were disposed of in September), and with these No. 466, during the remainder of the European war, made 170 raids on 92 different targets.
On 7th May 1945 No. 466 was transferred to Transport Command.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 466 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Wellington HE164-HD fallen to Meerhout on 14/02/1943
* Crash of Wellington HF569-HD fallen to Neerhespen
* Crash of Wellington HE212-HD fallen to Vollezeele on 30/05/1943
* Crash of Halifax HX267-HD-U fallen to Zemst on 28/05/1944
* Crash of Halifax NP975-HD-H fallen in France on 22/12/1944
* Crash of Halifax HX337-HD-W fallen to Basses-Arches on 22/04/1944
* Crash of Wellington LN288-HD fallen to Baudour on 14/07/1943

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467 Squadron

No. 467 Squadron was formed at Scampton on 7th November 1942, as a heavy-bomber squadron in No. 5 Group. In the latter part of that month it moved to Bottesford and after spending almost a year there returned to Lincolnshire - to Waddington, where it remained based for the rest of the European war.
Equipped with Lancasters, the squadron took part in all the major Bomber Command campaigns against Germany and German-occupied Europe-the Battles of the Ruhr, Hamburg, and Berlin, the attacks supporting Operation Overlord, etc.- and such other famous operations as the raids on Peenemünde, the V-weapons research station, and Gdynia, where the German battleship Lützow was sheltering. The squadron helped to inaugurate the so-called shuttle-bombing raids when, after attacking Friedrichshafen on 20th/2lst June 1943, it flew to North Africa and on the return flight bombed Spezia, the home of the Italian Navy.
No. 467 flew one of the most famous Lancasters in Bomber Command: R5868, a Mk. 1, which flew 137 operational sorties-more than any other RAF heavy bomber with the exception of Lancaster ED888 "Mike-Squared" (see No. 103 Squadron history). Originally "Q-Queenie" of No. 83 Squadron, R5868 logged 79 sorties (the first against Wilhelmshaven on 8th/9th July 1942, the 79th against Milan on 12th/13th August 1943) before joining No. 467 Squadron in November 1943, and becoming "S-Sugar". It resumed operations on 26th/27th November with a sortie against Berlin, and logged its 100th operation on 11th/12th May 1944, when the target was Bourg Leopold in Belgium. Its last operational sortie - to Flensburg on 23rd April 1945-was disappointingly anticlimactic: owing to 10/10 cloud no bombs were dropped. After the war "S-Sugar" was selected by the Air Ministry for preservation, and today it can be seen standing proudly in the Bomber Command Hall at the RAF Museum, Hendon.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 467 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Lancaster ED768-PO-N fallen near Antwerpen city on 26/05/1943
* Crash of Lancaster JB121-PO-U fallen near Antwerpen city on 3/11/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LL792-PO-E fallen to Beverlo on 11/05/1944
* Crash of Lancaster PD230-PO-X fallen to Gouvy on 13/08/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LM119-PO-E fallen to Kaaskerke on 21/07/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LM101-PO-J fallen to Kortrijk on 21/07/1944
* Crash of Lancaster DV396-PO-B fallen to Theux on 2/11/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LM376-PO-O fallen to Creppe on 31/03/1944

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485 Squadron

Manned primarily by pilots of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, but controlled operationally and administered by the RAF, 485 (NZ) Squadron was formed on 1 March 1941 at RAF Driffield, in Yorkshire by CO Marcus W B Knight. No 485 Sqn was equipped with old Spitfire Mk Is for its "working up" period in No. 13 Group RAF, which was carried out with no recorded fatalities. The Spitfire Mk Is were exchanged for Spitfire Mk IIs on 1 June 1941.
By July 1941 the squadron had scored its first victories, suffered its first combat fatalities and had moved to RAF Redhill, a frontline No. 11 Group RAF base to take part in offensive operations. One type of operation was fighter escort for "Circus" raids, in which a small number of RAF bombers (originally Bristol Blenheims and later Short Stirlings) were used as bait to draw up enemy fighters.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 485 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Spitfire EN559 fallen to Eernegem on 20/10/1943
* Crash of Spitfire JK762 fallen to Eernegem on 20/10/1943

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487 Squadron

No. 487 Squadron was formed at Feltwell, Norfolk, on 15th August 1942, as a light day-bomber squadron equipped with Lockheed Ventura aircraft and began operations on 6th December, when it contributed sixteen Venturas to the famous low-level raid on the Philips radio and valve factory at Eindhoven. The squadron continued daylight operations with Venturas-albeit very spasmodically-until late June 1943, and on 3rd May suffered a severe blow when ten out of eleven aircraft were shot down during a raid on Amsterdam. For his outstanding leadership in this operation, Squadron Leader LH Trent, a New Zealander in the RAF, who commanded the squadron's "B" Flight (and who was shot down and captured by the enemy) was, after the war when the full story of the raid became known, awarded the Victoria Cross.
On 1st June 1943, No. 487 left Bomber Command to become part of the newly-formed Second Tactical Air Force.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 487 squadron was involved:
* Crash of Mosquito NS834-EG-G fallen to Melsbroek on 2/11/1944
* Crash of Mosquito HX949 fallen to Moustier on 24/02/1944
* Crash of Mosquito HX937 fallen to Stekene on 9/10/1943

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500 Squadron

No.500 Squadron was formed at Manston on 16 March 1931 as a Special Reserve unit. These squadrons consisted of half regular and half reserve personnel for twin-engined units, and No.500 was equipped with Virginias on this basis. In October 1932 its establishment was fixed at six (plus two reserve) Virginias and two Avro 504Ks for flying training. On 5 December 1935, No.500 was redesignated a single-engined day bomber squadron, in view of the promised complexity of future heavy bombers and doubts as to whether reserve units could cope with them with part time personnel. Harts arrived in January 1936, and on 25 May 1936 the squadron was transferred from the Special Reserve to the Auxilary Air Force. In February 1937 Hinds began to replace Harts, but on 7 November 1938 the squadron was transferred to Coastal Command and received Ansons in March 1939. Shortly before the outbreak of war, No.500 was mobilised and began flying patrols over the Channel and the North Sea. In April 1941 conversion to Blenheims took place and these were used for reconnaissance, patrols and bombing raids on enemy coastal targets. In November 1941 Hudsons were received and in March 1942 the squadron moved to Scotland for patrols over the Adlantic and the approaches to the Clyde and the Irish Sea. At the end of August it moved to Cornwall and in November, soon after the Allied landings, to Algeria, there to fly anti-submarine patrols over the Western Mediterranean. In December 1943 Venturas began to arrive and replaced the Hudsons completly in April 1944. The squadron disbanded on 11 July 1944 and its aircraft were handed over to No.27 (SAAF) Squadron.
Before many of its personnel had left, No.500 reformed on 1 August 1944 at the same base where it had disbanded (La Senia) and moved to Italy later in the month. During September it received Baltimores and began operations on 10 December. Daylight raids on communications targets occupied the next few months but as the enemy took to moving only at night, the squadron's role changed to night interdiction for the rest of the war. In September 1945 No.500 left Italy for Kenya and was renumbered 249 Squadron on 23 October 1945.
On 10 May 1946, the Auxiliary Air Force was reformed and No.500 resumed recruiting in Kent in June, being based at West Malling as a night fighter squadron. Mosquito trainers arrived in October 1946 but it was April 1947 before the first Mosquito night fighter was taken on strength. In May 1948, the squadron began to receive Spitfires but in July the first Meteors replaced these as the squadron converted to a day fighter role. It flew Meteors until the Royal Auxiliary Air Force squadrons disbanded on 10 March 1957.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 500 squadron was involved:

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