Banner

* Unveiling of the National Memorial to the Soviet Armed Partisans in Belgium - 1944 - 2019 *

The RAF Squadrons involved in WW2 in Belgium



Last update: 29/10/2019

Leave your comment here

site search by freefind advanced

Choice your language

Elegy to
the Heroes of Silence



button button button button button button button button button button button button button button button button button button

Squadron 51 to 100

Click to go on the right squadron
51 Squadron
53 Squadron
54 Squadron
57 Squadron
58 Squadron
59 Squadron
61 Squadron
64 Squadron
65 Squadron
69 Squadron
72 Squadron
74 Squadron
75 Squadron
76 Squadron
77 Squadron
78 Squadron
80 Squadron
81 Squadron
82 Squadron
83 Squadron
85 Squadron
87 Squadron
88 Squadron
90 Squadron
91 Squadron
97 Squadron
98 Squadron
99 Squadron
100 Squadron
ligne

cest raf squadron

51 Squadron

WWI: 51 Squadron Royal Flying Corps flew B.E.2 and B.E.12 aircraft; the squadron formed at Thetford, Norfolk, before moving its headquarters to the airfield that later became RAF Marham. The squadron's primary role during the First World War was defence of the UK against German Zeppelin raids. It also used the Avro 504K to give night flying training to new pilots. The squadron disbanded in 1919.
Interwar years: The squadron was reborn when part of 150 Squadron was renumbered as 51 Squadron in March 1937, flying Virginias and Ansons. At this time the squadron badge was being chosen and a goose was chosen as a play on words: the squadron was flying the Anson and the Latin for goose is Anser. It was also appropriate for a bomber unit to have a heavy wild fowl to represent it.[6]
World War II: 51 Squadron dropped leaflets over Germany on the very first night of the Second World War, using the Whitley aircraft; bombs replaced leaflets in early 1940. A brief period as part of Coastal Command patrolling against the U-Boats in the Bay of Biscay preceded the re-equipment with the Halifax in 1942. 51 spent the rest of the war in Europe flying as part of No. 4 Group RAF, RAF Bomber Command's strategic bombing offensive against the Nazis, operating from RAF Snaith in East Yorkshire.
Postwar: The squadron became part of Transport Command with Stirlings and later Yorks following the end of the European war, transporting men and material to India and the far east. The squadron disbanded in 1950, after taking part in the Berlin Airlift.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 51 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax HR839-LK-L fallen to Herentals on 26/06/1943
* Crash of Halifax JN920-LK-L fallen to Turnhout on 22/10/1943
* Crash of Halifax LV783-MH-Z fallen to Moelingen on 28/04/1944
* Crash of Halifax MZ565-MH-O fallen to Kemexhe on 28/04/1944
* Crash of Whitley Z6803-MH-J fallen to Wandre on 6/08/1941
* Crash of Halifax MZ933-MH-W fallen to Marche-en-Famenne on 4/11/1944
* Crash of Halifax MZ451-MH-F fallen in Germany on 2/03/1945
* Crash of Halifax NP934-MH-V fallen to Charleroi on 18/12/1944
* Crash of Halifax JD262-MH-E fallen to Rance on 4/07/1943
* Crash of Halifax MZ593-MH-Z fallen to Kruipendaarde on 2/05/1944
* Crash of Whitley Z6569-MH-S fallen to Kortessem on 19/08/1941
* Crash of Whitley Z6479 MH-M fallen to Houthalen on 17/06/1941

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

53 Squadron

... In 1940 it was transferred from RAF Fighter Command to RAF Coastal Command, thereafter alternating between No. 16 Group RAF and No. 19 Group RAF. It moved to RAF St Eval, Cornwall, for anti-submarine and anti-shipping operations. In July 1941 the Blenheims were replaced by the Lockheed Hudson. In July 1942 the squadron was transferred to the Eastern Seaboard of the USA, from there it moved to Trinidad. It returned to Cornwall, RAF Davidstow Moor and was given Armstrong Whitworth Whitleys in early 1943. It moved on to stations in Norfolk but by May was operating the Consolidated Liberators at RAF Thorney Island, Hampshire.
53 Squadron Lockheed Hudsons in 1942: In September 1944 it was transferred to Iceland where it stayed until the end of the war in Europe. It came back to the UK to RAF St Davids, joining RAF Transport Command to carry troops to India. The squadron was disbanded at RAF Gransden Lodge on 15 June 1946...
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 53 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim L9399 fallen to Froyennes on 15/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim N3551-PZ-E fallen to Waarschoot on 17/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim R3661-PZ-A fallen outside of borders on 18/07/1940

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

54 Squadron

The early days of World War II were spent patrolling the Kent coast until, in May 1940, the unit provided air cover for the evacuation of Dunkirk, claiming 31 aircraft shot down for the loss of 4 pilots and seven Spitfires.
From July, the Squadron was heavily engaged in the Battle of Britain, often using RAF Manston as a forward operating base. The fighting was intense, and losses were heavy, with the Squadron being withdrawn to RAF Catterick on 2 September 1940. One notable pilot during the first year of the year was "Al" Deere, who claimed 11 German aircraft shot down,[13] while himself being shot down 7 times.
No. 54 Squadron returned to Hornchurch in February 1941,[15] flying fighter sweeps and bomber escort missions over Northern France until November 1941, when it moved north to RAF Castletown, Caithness, undertaking coastal patrols over the Pentland Firth. In June 1942, the squadron was moved to RAF Wellingore, to prepare for moving to Australia.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 54 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire R7222 fallen to Remingelst on 5/07/1941
* Crash of Spitfire B6707 fallen off the Belgian coast on 25/07/1940

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

57 Squadron

... In October 1931, No. 57 Squadron was re-formed at Netheravon as a day-bomber squadron equipped with the famous Hawker Hart, and continued with this type until May, 1936, when it re-equipped with the Hind. Blenheims came next and it was with these that the squadron, then based at Rosières in France, began bombing operations against the Germans when they invaded the Low Countries in May, 1940. With the advance of the German armies the squadron had to retreat, although even in retreat it took every opportunity to hit back. From Rosières it went to Poix, and from Poix to Crécy. Then, on 19th and 20th May, the squadron returned to England and on the 21st reassembled at Wyton. In June it moved to Northern Scotland and from July to October - after having first made an attack on enemy-occupied Norway - was employed on anti-shipping sweeps over the North Sea. It then moved south again, converted to Wellingtons and in January 1941, joined in the strategic night-bombing offensive.
In September 1942, the Wellingtons were replaced by Lancasters and in the following month the squadron contributed ten of its new aircraft to the historic low-level dusk raid on the Schneider works at Le Creusot.
In November 1942, No. 57 Squadron was visited by HM King George VI, this honour being followed, in 1943, by a further Royal visit - this time by both the King and Queen.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 57 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington R1624-DX fallen to Lozen on 16/07/1941
* Crash of Lancaster W4822-DX-P fallen to Hechtel on 3/11/1943
* Crash of Blenheim 6930-DX fallen to Vlijtingen on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Lancaster ED781-DX fallen to Lantin on 25/06/1943
* Crash of Blenheim L9180-DX fallen to Baasrode on 14/05/1940
* Crash of Lancaster W4234-DX fallen to Sint-Marten-Lierde on 21/12/1942
* Crash of Wellington X3162-DX fallen off coast on 22/03/1941
* Crash of Wellington X3425-DX fallen to Opoeteren on 2/04/1942

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

58 Squadron

... No. 58 was flying Whitleys from Yorkshire at the outbreak of the Second World War, and first went into action on the night of 3rd/4th September, 1939, when - in conjunction with No. 51 Squadron - it maid a leaflet raid over Germany. This was the first occasion on which R.A.F aircraft penetrated into Germany during the Second World War. A few weeks after this operation No. 58 was ordered to an airfield in South-West England for duty with Coastal Command and until late January, 1940, it was employed on escorting convoys and flying anti-submarine patrols. The squadron returned to Yorkshire in February and from April, 1940 to March, 1942, played a prominent part in the night-bombing offensive. Its targets were of the widest variety, from airfields, road and railway communications, marshalling yards and industrial centres, to the Channel Ports, oil and petrol installations and shipping at sea. Three highlights of this period were the squadron's participation in the first big attack on the German mainland (München-Gladbach) on 11th/12th May, 1940; the first attack on Italy (primary target Turin) on 11th/12th June, 1940; and the first attack on Berlin, on 25th/26th August, 1940.
In April, 1942, No. 58 Squadron was transferred to Coastal Command and during the remainder of the war, as a general reconnaissance unit (flying Halifaxes from 1943 onwards), took a considerable toll of enemy surface vessels, sank five U-boats and shared in the destruction of two others.
1. The greater part of this total was made up of 112-pounders, but 25-pounders ran the heavier bombs close; in addition, on two occasions - namely, the nights of 8th/9th and 14th/15th October, 1918 - a 1,650 pound bomb figured in the loads released on Valenciennes (North) and Audenarde railway junctions.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 58 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Whitley N1424-GE-P fallen to Antwerpen on 11/07/1940
* Crash of Whitley N1361-GE-F fallen to Ochamps on 23/05/1940

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

59 Squadron

No.59 Squadron was formed at Narborough Airfield in Norfolk on 1 August 1916 as a squadron of the Royal Flying Corps. On 13 February 1917, the Squadron crossed the English Channel, deploying to Saint-Omer in northern France to operate in the army co-operation role, equipped with Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.8s.
During the Second World War it was attached to RAF Fighter Command (1937–1940), Bomber Command (taking part in the Millennium II raid on Bremen) and Coastal Command (1940–1945). After the war, 59 Squadron was attached to Transport Command, flying troops to India from September 1945 until 15 June 1946, when the squadron was disbanded. On December 1st 1947 at RAF Waterbeach, half the crews of Number 51 Squadron were designated to reform as 59 Squadron. At 0800 the move from Waterbeach to RAF Abingdon commenced where upon arrival of their commanding officer, Squadron Leader E.V Best A.F.C at 1000, the squadron officially reformed, as a Long Range Transport Unit flying Avro Yorks. A detached flight would later take part in the Berlin Airlift (1948–49). The squadron disbanded again on 31 October 1950, then reformed at RAF Gutersloh, Germany in August 1956, when No. 102 Squadron was re-numbered 59, flying English Electric Canberra B.2s and B(I).8s. No. 59 Squadron was last disbanded in 1961, when it was re-numbered to No.3 Squadron.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 59 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim L-4859-TR fallen to Gembes on 15/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim R3613 fallen to Warneton on 26/05/1940
* Crash of an aircraft fallen somewhere in Belgium on 7/07/1941
* Crash of Blenheim N6173 fallen to Neerwinden on 13/05/1944

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

61 Squadron

... In the summer of 1942 No. 61 was twice loaned to Coastal Command for anti-submarine operations in the Bay of Biscay. It was detached from its base in Rutland to St. Eval in Cornwall and on the very first occasion that it operated from there - on 17th July - a crew captained by Flight Lieutenant PR Casement (Lancaster I R5724) became the first Bomber Command crew to bring back irrefutable evidence that they had destroyed a U-boat at sea - a photograph showing the U-boat crew in the water swimming away from their sinking vessel.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 61 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster R5613-QR fallen to La Hulpe, on 3/06/1942
* Crash of Lancaster JA695-QR-W fallen to Kievermont on 11/04/1944
* Crash of Manchester L7470-QR fallen to Piringen on 07/04/1942
* Crash of Lancaster PA165-QR-V fallen to Houffalize on 5/01/1944
* Crah of Lancaster W4236-QR-K fallen to Marbehan on 10/08/1943
* Crash of Lancaster R5734-QR-V fallen to Monin on 31/03/1944
* Crash of Lancaster W4317-QR-R fallen to Givry on 17/04/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LM454-QR-Z fallen to Melsele on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Lancaster PD199-QR-C fallen to Verviers on 2/11/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LL777-QR-S fallen to Ursel on 6/12/1944

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

64 Squadron

n April 1940 the squadron converted to the Supermarine Spitfire Mk I. It was immediately engaged in the covering of the Dunkirk evacuation and later took part in the Battle of Britain. In short order 64 squadron operated from Kenley starting 16 May 1940, from Leconfield starting 19 August, from Biggin Hill starting 13 October, from Coltishall starting 15 October, and from Boscombe Down starting 1 September 1940.
In May 1941, No. 64 Squadron moved up to Scotland for air defence duties but moved back south in November to take part in sweeps over northern France, until March 1943 when it moved back up to Scotland again. Then in August 1943 it moved back south again to resume offensive operations and in June 1944, moved to Cornwall for 2 months before beginning long-range escort missions from East Anglia. During that time the squadron was equipped with various marks of the Spitfire: Mk IIA January to November 1941, Mk VB November 1941 to July 1942, and March to September 1943, Mk VC September 1943 to July 1944, and finally Mk IX June 1942 to March 1943, and June to November 1944. In 1944 64 Squadron took part in the operations of the Normandy Landings, Operation Market Garden, and the Battle of the Scheldt.
Personnel of 64 Squadron in front of their Gloster Javelin FAW.7 at RAF Duxford in 1959.
In November 1944 the squadron received the North American Mustang III and flew these for the rest of the war covering daylight raids of the RAF Bomber Command on Germany. After the end of hostilities the squadron moved to RAF Horsham St Faith and received the Mustang IV in August 1945.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

* Crash in which the 64 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire BR602 fallen to Brugge on 7/09/1942

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

65 Squadron

No 65 Squadron was formed at Wyton on 1 August 1916 from a nucleus flight supplied by Norwich training station and used a variety of types for training until it left for France with Camels in October 1917. It began flying defensive patrols over the Western Front and in February 1918 began ground attack missions with light bombs on enemy troops and battlefield positions. In August 1918, it moved to the Belgian coastal sector and provided escorts for day bombers attacking enemy bases. During the lst weeks of the war it covered the Allied advance into Belgium and returned to the UK in February 1919, disbanding on 25 October 1919.
On 1 August 1934, No 65 reformed at Hornchurch with Demons but in September 1935 it began losing its personnel to drafts being sent to the Middle East during the Abyssinian crisis and was reduced to a cadre, being brought up to strength from July 1936, at the same time as Gauntlets were received to replace the remaining Demons. In June 1937, it re-equipped with Gladiators, converting to Spitfires in March 1939. In June 1940, offensive patrols began to be flown over France and the Low Countries to cover the evacuation from Dunkirk, the squadron being moved to Lincolnshire to refit at the end of May. It returned south a week later and took part in the Battle of Britain until the end of August, when it moved to Scotland. In November 1940 the Squadron moved south again and began offensive sweeps over northern France in January 1941 before moving to Lincolnshire in February 1941. In October 1941, No. 65 received Spitfire Vs which it used for low-level attacks on enemy transport and shipping reconnaissance until October 1942, when it moved back to Scotland. No. 65 moved down to Cornwall in March 1943 for fighter patrols and bomber escort missions. In December the Squadron converted to Mustangs which were used in the fighter-bomber role and in June 1944 No. 65 had moved to Normandy where it supported the army until September 1944. The Squadron was then moved to East Anglia to act as fighter escorts for Bomber Command's daylight raids over Germany until January 1945 when it moved back to Scotland to provide similar services to Coastal Command attacking shipping off Norway and Denmark.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

* Crash in which the 65 squadron was involved:

Crash of Spitfire MA835 on 3/01/1944
* Crash of Mustang FZ125-YT-C fallen to Neerpelt on 17/09/1944
* Crash of Spitfire BL647 fallen to Wenduine on 1/06/1942

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

69 Squadron

No. 69 Squadron was formed on 28 December 1916 at South Carlton. In September 1917 it moved to France as a corps reconnaissance unit and on 19 January 1918 was redesignated No. 3 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps.
On 10 January 1941, No. 431 Flight was redesignated No. 69 Squadron. Based in Malta, it carried out strategic reconnaissance missions mainly using Marylands until May 1942 when Spitfires began to carry out all reconnaissance missions. These were later supplemented by Baltimores for shipping reconnaissance and anti-submarine patrols until April 1944 when the Squadron returned to the UK. No. 69 re-assembled at Northolt on 5 May 1944 with Wellingtons for night reconnaissance duties beginning operations on the eve of D-Day. In September the Squadron moved to France and Belgium until 7 May 1945, the Squadron disbanding on 7 August 1945.
On 8 August 1945, No. 613 Squadron at Cambrai was renumbered No. 69 Squadron flying Mosquito fighter-bombers until it was disbanded on 31 March 1946. The next day, No. 180 Squadron was renumbered No. 69 at Wahn again equipped with Mosquito light bombers until again disbanded on 6 November 1947. No. 69 was reformed on 5 May 1954 at Laarbruch as a Canberra reconnaissance unit and remained in Germany until renumbered No. 39 Squadron on 1 July 1958.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 69 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington NC573 fallen to Melsbroek on 8/02/1945
* Crash of Wellington HZ863 fallen to Winksele-Delle on 18/11/1944
* Crash of Wellington HE759 fallen to Roermond (NL) on 21/11/1944

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

74 Squadron

On 6 September 1939, after an early morning air raid alert, a flight of No. 56 Squadron Hawker Hurricanes took off from North Weald. These were followed by two reserve Hurricanes. The two reserves were identified as enemy aircraft and Spitfires from Hornchurch, among them 74 Squadron, were ordered to attack them. Both were shot down. One pilot, P/O Montague Hulton-Harrop was killed; the other pilot, Frank Rose, survived. The pilot who fired the fatal shots was 74 Squadron's John Freeborn. The exact story of what happened in this incident, which came to be known as the "Battle of Barking Creek", may never be known. Even the origin of the name is obscure, as it did not take place above Barking Creek but near Ipswich, in Suffolk. This was the first RAF operational death of the war. At the subsequent courts martial, it was accepted that the entire incident was an unfortunate error.
The Squadron, as part of No 12 Group RAF, first saw combat during the evacuation from Dunkirk, in battles which exacted a heavy toll on both pilots and aircraft. Thereafter No.74 served successfully through the Battle of Britain. Mark I Spitfires were replaced with the Mark IIa in September 1940 at RAF Coltishall. The squadron moved back south to RAF Biggin Hill in October for the end of the Battle. The Squadron went to the north of England in July 1941 to regroup, from there moving around to stations in Wales and Northern Ireland until in April 1942 it was sent, without aircraft, to the Middle East, arriving in Egypt in June. The squadron was then moved to Palestine to operate as a maintenance unit for USAAF B-24 Liberators. It received Hurricane IIBs in December 1942 and served in Iran until May 1943, moving back to Egypt for shipping patrols and conversion to the Spitfire Mk.Vb and Mk.Vc in September 1943.
In late October 1943, the squadron got Mk.IX Spitfires, which were swapped for Mk. XVIs in March. No 74 returned home just in time for Operation Overlord (the Allied invasion of Normandy in June 1944). It was equipped with the Spitfire IX HF operating from RAF Lympne in Air Defence of Great Britain, though under the operational control of RAF Second Tactical Air Force (2nd TAF). For the rest of the war, it used its aircraft as fighter-bombers supporting the Allied liberation of France, Belgium and the Netherlands.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 74 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire X4668-ZP-E fallen to Adinkerke on 27/06/1941
* Crash of Spitfire PL770 fallen to Wevelgem on 29/09/1944
* Crash of Spitfire P9379 fallen off the Belgian coast on 31/07/1940
* Crash of Spitfire R6757 fallen off coast on 11/08/1940

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

75 Squadron

No.75 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Goldington (Bedford) on 1st October 1916, as a Home Defence unit. Its first equipment consisted of the usual collection of single- and two-seat BE types, but it later received Avros and then Sopwith Camels.
Disbanded in Essex in 1919, the squadron was re-formed in 1937 as a heavy bomber squadron but in March 1939, became a Group pool squadron or, in other words, assumed the role of what was later known as an operational training unit. Soon after the outbreak of war the squadron was posted to No.6 (Training) Group and on 4th April 1940, its number plate, with the letters "NZ" added, was transferred to a Royal New Zealand Air Force heavy bomber flight which was based at Feltwell, Norfolk, a station in No. 3 Group.
Equipped with Wellingtons, No. 75 (NZ) Squadron of the RAF - the first Commonwealth squadron to be formed in Bomber Command - took part in the early bombing offensive against enemy-occupied territories, and while returning from a raid on Munster on 7/8th July 1941, one of its aircrew, Sergeant Pilot JR Ward, RNZAF, won the Victoria Cross. Towards the end of 1942 the squadron converted to Stirlings and subsequently contributed to the Battle of the Ruhr, the devastation of Hamburg, and the famous raid against the German V-weapons experimental station at Peenemunde. In March 1944, No. 75 began to exchange its Stirlings for Lancasters and was ready in time to participate in preparation and support of the Allied invasion, the bombing of flying-bomb sites and close-support of the armies. (Here it may be mentioned that a Lancaster of the squadron (ND917, a Mark III, captained by Squadron Leader NA Williamson, RNZAF) was, on 30th June, 1944, the first British heavy bomber to land in Normandy after the invasion began. The Lancaster was returning from an attack on Villers Bocage in support of the Army and the pilot brought it down on one of the new landing strips in the beach-head in order to seek medical aid for his flight engineer, who had been wounded by flak.) In the later stages of the war No. 75 Squadron played a prominent part in the offensive against German oil production and transport. It was also one of the foremost units in Bomber Command's successful minelaying campaign.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 75 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Stirling EH938-AA-F fallen to Lommel on 31/08/1943
* Crash of Lancaster ME690-AA-Z fallen to Neerpelt on 23/05/1944
* Crash of Stirling BK817-AA-B fallen to Froidthier on 12/06/1943
* Crash of Wellington X9981-AA fallen to Dinant on 12/10/1941
* Crash of Stirling BF513-AA-E fallen to Regniessart on 15/04/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LL921-AA-E fallen to Haulchin on 19/07/1944
* Crash of Stirling LJ442-JN-F fallen to Horrues on 19/11/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LL921-AA-E fallen to Harveng on 19/07/1944
* Crash of Wellington R3157-AA-H fallen to Kain on 21/05/1940
* Crash of Wellington DF673-AA fallen to Moerbeke on 29/08/1942
* Crash of Wellington T2463-AA-E fallen to Oostende on 20/09/1940
* Crash of Lancaster ND908-AA-M fallen to Poelkapelle on 28/05/1944
* Crash of Wellington Z9914-AA fallen to Werken on 22/10/1941
* Crash of Spitfire R6962 fallen off coast on 11/08/1940
* Crash of Stirling BK602-AA-R fallen off coast on 26/05/1943
* Crash of Lancaster HK564-AA-P fallen to Ouren on 4/07/1943

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

76 Squadron

No.76 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Ripon, Yorkshire, on 15th September 1916, as a Home Defence unit. Headquarters were at Ripon and flights were stationed at Copmanthorpe, Helperby and Catterick from its formation until March 1919. In June 1919, the squadron was disbanded at Tadcaster. The squadron was re-formed in April 1937, at Finningley, Yorkshire, as a bomber unit equipped with Wellesleys, but by the outbreak of the Second World War it had been re-equipped with Hampdens and Ansons and had assumed the role of a Group (No. 5) training unit. In late September 1939, it moved and transferred to Upper Heyford and No. 6 (Training) Group, and in April 1940, was absorbed into No. 16 OTU. After a false start it re-formed in May 1941 - again in Yorkshire - as a Halifax heavy bomber squadron in No. 4 Group. The second squadron to fly the Halifax, it began operations on the night of 12/13th June 1941, and maintained its offensive until the end of the European war was in sight.
The squadron bombed targets of the widest variety-from industrial centres, railways, gun batteries, oil and petrol installations, to the Channel Ports, Noball sites and concentrations of troops and armour-and on the night of 10/11th April 1942, it made history by dropping the first 8,000lb High Capacity bomb on the enemy in a raid on Essen1. Two further highlights of its war record were its participation in a series of three attacks on the Tirpitz in the Trondheim area in March and April 1942, and in the heavy raid on Peenemunde in August 1943. In addition to operating in Europe No. 76, or more accurately, a detachment from it, operated in the Middle East for a while (in 1942) and then merged with a detachment from No. 10 Squadron to become No. 462 Squadron, RAAF.
From August 1942 to April 1943, No 76 Squadron was commanded by Wing Commander GL Cheshire. When he left the squadron on being posted to Marston Moor as station commander, No. 76's diarist wrote: "What the squadron has lost Marston Moor will gain. It was under the character and personal supervision of Group Captain Cheshire that the squadron became what it is today-one of the best in Bomber Command".
On 7th May 1945, No.76 Squadron was transferred to Transport Command.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 76 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax DT556-MP-U fallen to Kasterlee on 2/03/1943
* Crash of MZ575-MP-W fallen to Halshout on 13/05/1944
* Crash of Halifax DT496-MP-A fallen to Verviers on 5/10/1942
* Crash of Halifax DK137-MP-R fallen to Liege on 29/06/1943
* Crash of Halifax MZ740-MP-R fallen to Nassogne on 26/12/1944
* Crash of Halifax W1244-MP-D fallen to Diksmuide on 1/09/1942
* Crash of Halifax LL577-MP-M fallen to Jalhay on 5/11/1944

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

77 Squadron

... In addition to Nickelling, No. 77 was employed on reconnaissance and Security Patrols during the early months of the war and in the course of some of its Security Patrols dropped bombs on what appeared to be harbour and seaplane base landing lights at or near Borkum, Sylt and Nordeney. The spring of 1940 saw the squadron start bombing in earnest and during the period March to June it figured in several notable Bomber Command "firsts". On 19/2Oth March it took part in the first attack on an enemy land target (Hornum, on the island of Sylt); on 11/12th May it took part in the first big attack on the German mainland (the exits of Munchen-Gladbach); and on 11/12th June it took part in the first attack on Italy (primary target the Fiat works at Turin).
No. 77 Squadron continued its offensive against enemy land targets until April 1941, and then, early in May, was posted to Chivenor, North Devon, for temporary duty with No. 19 Group, Coastal Command. From Chivenor the Whitleys were mainly employed on flying anti-submarine patrols over the Bay of Biscay and on 3rd September one of them attacked and sank with depth charges U-705.
Back in Yorkshire with its old parent Group (No. 4) No. 77 Squadron began to convert to Halifaxes in October 1942, and was ready in plenty of time for the Battle of the Ruhr which opened in the following spring. The, squadron continued with Halifaxes for the rest of the European war and, in addition to playing a prominent part in the bomber offensive, also participated in Bomber Command's highly-successful Gardening, or minelaying, campaign. It also shared - in September/October 1944 - in the task of flying nearly half a million gallons of petrol to an airfield near Brussels for the Second Army which was then desperately short of petrol for its lorries and tanks.
On 7th May 1945, No. 77 Squadron was transferred to Transport Command
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 77 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Whitley P4992-KN-T to Antwerpen on 18/09/1940
* Crash of Halifax W7813-KN-C fallen to Gruitrode on 26/05/1943
* Crew of Whitley Z6578-KN-P fallen to Rotem on 17/05/1941
* Crash of Halifax JD168-KN-T fallen to Oupeye on 12/06/1943
* Crash of Halifax LL125-KL-K fallen to Fronville on 20/12/1943
* Crash of Halifax JD413-KN-G fallen in Germany on 1/09/1943
* Crash of Withley Z6801-KN fallen to Daussois on 13/10/1941
* Crash of Halifax JD371-KN-O fallen to Modave on 28/08/1943
* Crash of Halifax DT734-KN-J fallen to Boussu on 10/03/1943
* Crash of Halifax JD167-KN-Z fallen to Dour on 11/08/1943
* Crash of Whitley Z6743-KN fallen to Oostende on 10/07/1941
* Crash of Halifax JD213-KN-V fallen off coast on 23/06/1943
* Crash of Halifax MZ829-KN-X fallen to Jalhay on 2/11/1944

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

78 Squadron

... From July to October 1942, No.78 Squadron was commanded by Wing Commander JB Tait, who later led the combined force of Lancasters from Nos. 617 (the squadron he then commanded) and 9 Squadrons which, using 12,000Ib Tallboy bombs, destroyed the Tirpitz in Tromso fjord.
According to a statistical summary of No. 78's wartime effort in the squadron ORB, No. 78 flew, a total of 6,337 sorties comprising 6,017 bombing sorties and 320 minelaying sorties; made 302 bombing raids and bombed 167 different targets; dropped approximately 17,000 tons of bombs - 7,000 tons (i.e. more than a third of the total) between D-Day and VE Day; successfully laid 1,064 mines; and destroyed 31 enemy aircraft (11 more were classified as "probably destroyed ") and damaged 35. The squadron's own losses totalled 182 aircraft.
On 7th May 1945, No.78 Squadron was transferred from Bomber Command to Transport Command.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 78 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax JD409-EY-D fallen to Westmalle on 31/08/1943
* Crash of Halifax W1061-EY fallen to Wommelgem on 12/08/1942
* Crash of Halifax JB873-EY-J fallen to Heverlee on 13/05/1943
* Crash of Halifax W7809-EY fallen to Tombeek on 28/08/1942
* Crash of Halifax W1245-EY-B fallen to Méan on 12/08/1942
* Crash of Halifax W7782-EY-C fallen to Sclayn on 8/09/1942
* Crash of Halifax LK749-EY-J fallen to Walcourt on 27/03/1944
* Crash of Halifax JD108-EY-U fallen to Froidchapelle on 14/07/1943
* Crash of Lancaster MZ340-EY-X fallen to Ramskapelle on 28/07/1944

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

80 Squadron

The squadron was reformed in March 1937 again as No. 80 Sqn, now equipped with Gloster Gauntlet aircraft. However, by now the Gauntlet was considered by many to be outdated, and as a result they were replaced by the Gloster Gladiator just two months later. In 1938, the squadron again returned to Egypt as an 'air defence unit'. After Italy's declaration of war on Libya, No. 80 was moved to the Egyptian-Libyan border but was one of the units sent to aid the Greeks during the Greco-Italian War, Initially flying Gladiators and then re-equipping with the Hawker Hurricane from February 1941.[6] The Squadron lost most of its Aircraft during the Greek and Crete actions and reformed at RAF Aqir in Palestine in May 1941. Before deploying Detachments to Nicosia in Cyprus and 'A' Flight to Haifa. The Squadron moved totally to Cyprus in July 1941, before returning to Syria the next month, and joining the fighting in North Africa two months later. During the Battle of El Alamein it was responsible for defending communications lines. It remained in that area until early 1944, when it returned to Britain to prepare for Operation Overlord (the Allied invasion of Europe). It was equipped with the Spitfire IX F operating from RAF Detling in Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB), though under the operational control of RAF Second Tactical Air Force (2nd TAF).[7] When 2nd TAF began moving to Normandy after D-Day, the squadron remained in ADGB, re-equipping with Hawker Tempest aircraft on anti-V-1 flying bomb duties as part of Operation Diver. After this threat diminished, 80 Sqn moved on to the Continent and resumed fighter duties until the end of the war.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 80 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Tempest NV983 fallen in Germany on 16/04/1945

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

81 Squadron

On 1 December 1939 the Communications Squadron at Mountjoie, France, operating de Havilland Tiger Moths, was redesignated No. 81. It was disbanded on 15 June 1940, when the advancing German forces forced its withdrawal to the United Kingdom.
Following the German Invasion of the Soviet Union, it was decided to send a wing of Hawker Hurricane fighters to assist the Soviet war effort,and No. 81 Squadron reformed at RAF Leconfield on 29 July 1941 as part of No. 151 Wing RAF. In September it flew its Hurricanes off the carrier HMS Argus, deploying to an airfield near Murmansk. It flew both defensive sorties and escort missions for Soviet bombers, while carrying out its principal role of training Soviet pilots on the Hurricane. After a few weeks of operations the Hurricanes were handed over to the Soviets and the Squadron left to return to the UK at the end of November.
When it arrived back at the UK, it was re-equipped with Supermarine Spitfires at RAF Turnhouse, Edinburgh, being declared operational on 1 February 1942. It moved to RAF Hornchurch near London in May, flying its first operation, escorting Hurricanes bombing Bruges on 1 June.
At the end of October the Squadron moved to Gibraltar and on 8 November, 19 Spitfires moved to the newly captured airfield at Maison Blanche, Algiers. Following the German surrender in North Africa, it moved to Malta in preparation for the Invasion of Sicily. It then moved to Italy in September but was withdrawn to Egypt in November to prepare for deployment to the Far East. During operations in the Mediterranean, they found their most frequent opponents were Jagdgeschwader 53 who had an ace of spades motif on their aircraft. As the squadron commander considered that they had 'bested' their enemy, they took the motif and started applying it to their aircraft.
It arrived at Alipore, India in December 1943, equipped with more modern Spitfire VIII, starting operations in January, flying fighter and ground attack missions in support of the Second Battle of Arakan and the Battle of Imphal as part of the RAF Third Tactical Air Force. It was withdrawn to Ceylon in August and disbanded on 20 June 1945.[2][6] On the same day 123 Squadron was renumbered 81 Squadron but its Thunderbolts did not become operational before the war ended. In October, the squadron was sent to Java during the Indonesian War of Independence, flying tactical reconnaissance duties and covering Allied road convoys, while attacking nationalist held airfields and ammunition dumps. On 30 June 1946, the squadron was again disbanded.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 81 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire BM227 fallen to Oostduinkerke on 29/07/1942

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

82 Squadron

No. 82 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Doncaster, Yorkshire, on 7th January 1917, and from November 1917, until the Armistice served as an army co-operation unit on the Western Front flying Armstrong Whitworth FK8 aircraft. Disbanded in 1919, it re-formed as a bomber unit in 1937 and during the early part of the Second World War, flying Blenheims, played a prominent part in No. 2 Group's offensive against shipping in the English Channel and the North Sea, and "fringe" targets on the Continent. On two occasions during the summer of 1940 it was almost wiped out, but each time-thanks to the exceptional determination of the CO, Wing Commander the Earl of Bandon - it was re-formed within 48 hours to fight again. The squadron left bomber Command and moved to India in the early part of 1942 to join the effort against the Japanese.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 82 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim T2225-UX on 10/12/1940

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

83 Squadron

No. 83 Squadron spent the first half of the Second World War operating as a night bomber squadron with Bomber Command. Unlike many Bomber Command squadrons, No. 83 Squadron went into action on the first day of the war, carrying out a sweep over the North Sea looking for German warships.
Bombing missions did not begin until 20 April 1940, after the German invasion of Norway. It retained it's Hampdens for just over two years, and when it did get new aircraft they were Avro Manchesters. The first Manchester mission was flown on 28 January 1942 and the flaws in the aircraft soon began apparent. After only four months of operations, the Manchesters were replaced by Avro Lancasters, which the squadron kept for the rest of the war. In August 1942 No. 83 Squadron became part of the Pathfinder Force, carrying out target marking duties for the rest of the war.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 83 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster ND389-QL-A fallen to Beerse on 11/04/1944
* Crash of Lancaster R5610-OL-C fallen to Morkhoven on 27/04/1943
* Crash of Hampden AD859-OL-O fallen to Munsterbilzen on 29/09/1944
* Crash of Lancaster JB724-OL-V fallen to Sautour on 27/01/1944
* Crash of Hampden X3119-OL-R fallen to Houthulst on 21/04/1941

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

85 Squadron

On 1 June 1938, the squadron was reformed from the renumbered elements of "A" Flight of No. 87 Squadron RAF and placed under the command of Flight Lieutenant D. E. Turner. The squadron was posted to RAF Debden in Essex and commenced training on the Gloster Gladiator (the RAF's last biplane fighter). On 4 September the first Hawker Hurricanes began arriving in numbers. With war looking likely in Europe, No. 85 Squadron received the signal ordering its immediate mobilisation on 23 August 1939, the aircraft making up both "A" and "B" Flights were kept at a state of constant readiness and by 1 September the squadron had completed its preparation for the impending move to France....
For the full text, see here
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in which the 82 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Huricane P2535 fallen in Belgium on 16/05/1940

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

87 Squadron

7 Squadron was re-formed on 15 March 1937 at RAF Tangmere from elements of No. 54 Squadron RAF, operating the Hawker Fury. At the outbreak of the Second World War, the squadron was part of the air element of the British Expeditionary Force in France, equipped with Hawker Hurricanes. Flight Lieutenant Ian Gleed was posted to the squadron as a replacement pilot on 17 May 1940 and became an ace in two days. He took command of the squadron in December 1940.
John Strachey MP served as the intelligence officer for the squadron during the Battle of Britain.
In July 1944 87 Squadron became one of two RAF Squadrons to join No. 8 Wing SAAF (the other being RAF 185 Squadron) and began fighter-bomber operations supporting the fighting in Italy as well as taking part in offensive sweeps across the Balkans from its detached Italian bases. It continued in this role in the Italian Campaign until the end of the war.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 87 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Hurricane L1834 fallen to Ramegnies-Chin on 19/05/1940

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

88 Squadron

No. 88 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Gosport, Hampshire, on 24th July 1917, and the following April went to France as a fighter-reconnaissance squadron equipped with Bristol Fighters. During its few months of active operations it claimed the destruction of 164 enemy aircraft. Its own casualties were 2 killed, 5 wounded and 10 missing.
Disbanded in 1919, the squadron was re-formed in 1937 as a bomber squadron and on the outbreak of war went to France as part of the Advanced Air Striking Force, flying Fairey Battles. On 20th September 1939, during a reconnaissance patrol over the enemy's front lines, one of its Battles scored Britain's first air combat "kill" of World War 2 when it shot down a Bf.109. (The person actually responsible for this "kill" was Sergeant F Letchford, an air observer; he was flying in an aircraft piloted by Flying Officer LH Baker.)
No. 88 Squadron returned to England in June 1940 - after having seen some very heavy fighting and having suffered heavy losses - and the following year, after a spell with Bristol Blenheims, became the first squadron to be equipped with Douglas Bostons. It took part in many shipping strikes and other bombing operations-including the attacks on gun positions in connection with the famous Dieppe raid of 19th August 1942 - and in 1943-44 attacked Noball (flying bomb) sites and invasion targets. On D-Day it laid a smoke screen for some of the assault troops. Towards the end of 1944, operating with the 2nd Tactical Air Force (of which it had been a part since June 1943), the squadron went to the Continent for the third time in its history. It was disbanded the following April.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 88 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Battle P2251-RH fallen to Vaux-sur-Sûre on 11/05/1940
* Crash of Boston Z2179-RH fallen to Diksmuide on 31/10/1942
* Crash of Boston Z2260-RH fallen to Duinhoek on 29/08/1942
* Crash of Battle P2261-RH fallen to Saint-Vith on 11/05/1940
* Crash of Battle P2202-RH fallen to Saint-Vith on 11/05/1940

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

90 Squadron

... Soon after the outbreak of war No. 90 ceased to be a first-line unit and assumed the role of a Group pool squadron or, in other words, became a training squadron. In April 1940, it was absorbed into. No.17 OTU but in May 1941, it re-formed, having been selected as the RAF squadron to receive the first Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress aircraft from America. Its role was now high-altitude day bombing and it flew its first operational mission with Fortresses on 8th July 1941, when Wilhelmshaven was attacked from 30,000 feet. It continued to operate its Fortresses over Europe - albeit with little success - until September 1941, and, later, had a detachment operating in the Middle East.
The squadron was again disbanded in February 1942, but re-formed in November 1942, as a heavy-bomber squadron equipped with Stirlings, and subsequently made a significant contribution to the Battle of the Ruhr, the devastation of Hamburg and the famous raid on Peenemunde. It also did a great deal of minelaying. In May/June 1944, No. 90 exchanged its Stirlings for Lancasters and with these continued to playa prominent part in Bomber Command's offensive until late April 1945.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 90 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Stirling BF530-OJ-B fallen to Geetbets on 4/07/1943
* Crash of Stirling BK813-WP-O fallen to Haasrode on 25/06/1943
* Crash of Stirling EE873-WP-D fallen to Rotem on 14/07/1943
* Crash of Lancaster HE664-WP-V fallen to Germany on 23/12/1944
* Crash of Stirling EH907-WP-O fallen to Aalst on 4/07/1943

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

91 Squadron

n January 1941 the squadron was reformed from No. 421 (Reconnaissance) Flight and based at RAF Hawkinge, Kent equipped with Spitfires, carrying out weather reconnaissance and Air Sea Rescue operations. In April 1943 they were upgraded to Spitfire XIIs,the first Griffon engined Spitfires, which proved very successful in intercepting the low-flying Focke-Wulf 190s. They also flew reconnaissance missions over northern France and later concentrated on bomber escort duties. In March 1944 the squadron was assigned to the Second Tactical Air Force and flew tactical sweeps over the Normandy landing zones. Later in the year, now based at RAF West Malling, Kent and equipped with the faster Spitfire XIVs they were deployed to combat the V-1 flying-bomb attacks (Capitaine Jean Maridor was blown up in mid-air when he got in too close to shoot a V-1 down. In April 1945 the squadron relocated to East Anglia to carry out reconnaissance missions and searches for midget submarines off the coast of the Netherlands and Belgium.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 91 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire MK453 fallen to Maldegem on 28/10/1944
* Crash of Spitfire EN614 fallen to Boezinge on 19/09/1943
* Crash of Spitfire W3132 fallen to Raversijde on 8/02/1942

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

97 Squadron

No. 97 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Waddington, Lincolnshire, on 1st December 1917, and in the following summer went to France equipped with Handley Page 0/400s to undertake night-bombing operations with the Independent Force. It made its first raid on 19/20th August and by the end of the war had flown 91 bombing sorties (the majority into Germany), dropped 64 tons of bombs-including three 1,650-pounders.
Re-equipped with DH10s, No. 97 went to India in the summer of 1919 and subsequently operated on the Waziristan frontier and flew the first air mail services in India (Bombay-Karachi).
No. 97 was re-numbered 60 on 1st April 1920, and next appeared in September 1935, as a night-bomber squadron at Catfoss. Some of the main events in its subsequent history can be summarised as follows: June 1938-(at Leconfield) ceased to be an operational squadron and became part of an air observers' school; March 1939-became a No. 4 Group pool squadron; Sep 1939-moved to Abingdon and joined No. 6 (Training) Group; April 1940-merged with 166 Squadron and SHQ Abingdon to form No.10 OTU; May 1940 - re-formed at Driffield in No. 4 Group as a Whitley heavy bomber squadron but disbanded again same month; February 1941 - re-formed at Waddington in No. 5 Group as a heavy-bomber squadron equipped with Avro Manchesters; March 1941 - moved to Coningsby; April 1941 - began operations against Fortress Europe; January 1942 - began to convert to Lancasters; 17th April 1942 - in conjunction with No. 44 Squadron made historic low-level daylight attack on MAN Diesel engine works at Augsburg; June/July 1942 - took part in 1,000-bomber raids on Cologne, Essen and Bremen; October 1942 - took part in No. 5 Group's famous dusk attack on Schneider locomotive and armament works at Le Creusot and the Group's (and Bomber Command's) first daylight attack on Italy (Milan); April 1943 - moved to Bourn, joined No. 8 (PFF) Group and became a "marker" squadron; June 1943 - marked/illuminated Zeppelin works at Friedrichshafen and Italian naval base at Spezia on occasion of first "shuttle-bombing" raid; April 1944 - returned to Coningsby and No. 5 Group to help lead the Group against separate targets; 25/26th April 1945 - flew final offensive mission.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 97 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster R5537-OF-B fallen to Westmalle on 25/08/1942
* Crash of Lancaster JB367-OF-S fallen to Bommershoven on 18/11/1943
* Crash of Lancaster ED923-OF-V fallen to Bassenge on 9/07/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LM-323-OF-U fallen to Jalhay on 29/06/1943
* Crash of Lancaster JA707-OF-V fallen to sibret on 28/08/1943
* Crash of Lancaster R5502-OF-M fallen to Maurage on 28/08/1942
* Crash of Manchester L7384-OF fallen outside of borders on 16/08/1941

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

98 Squadron

... After re-forming at Gatwick in July 1940, the squadron, still equipped with Battles, saw almost a year's-worth of service in Iceland with Coastal Command. It was disbanded in July 1941, but in September 1942, re-formed at West Raynham as a bomber squadron flying Mitchell aircraft. It moved to Foulsham in mid-October and on 22nd January 1943, used its Mitchells against the enemy for the first time when an attack was made on oil targets at Terneuzen (Ghent) in Belgium. In August 1943, by which time it was part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force, No. 98 moved to Dunsfold, and subsequently took part in pre-invasion attacks on Northern France and on the Noball sites in the Pas de Calais. After D-Day it operated in close support of the advancing Allied armies, and from October 1944, onwards was based on the Continent. When VE Day finally came it was stationed at Achmer in Germany.
After the end of the war No. 98 converted to Mosquitoes and remained with the occupation forces. In February 1951, the Squadron received Vampire fighter-bombers, replacing these with Venoms in 1953. In April 1955 the Squadron received Hunters and became a day fighter unit until disbanding on 15 July 1957. On 1 August 1959, the Squadron was reformed again at Driffield as a Thor intermediate range ballistic missile unit, disbanding again on 18 April 1963. The following day No. 245 Squadron at Tangmere was renumbered No. 98 and in October moved its Canberras to Watton. In April 1969, it moved to Cottesmore and was disbanded again on 27 February 1976.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 98 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Mitchell B25 FL693-VO-M fallen to Bassevelde on 22/01/1943
* Crash of Mitchell-B25 ? fallen on unknown place on 10/06/1943

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

99 Squadron

No. 99 Squadron is a squadron of the Royal Air Force which operates the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III strategic/tactical transport aircraft from RAF Brize Norton.
The squadron conducts global deployments on behalf of the British Armed Forces and the UK Government, notably delivering emergency aid during natural disasters and supporting military operations overseas.
No. 99 was a bomber squadron in both World War I and World War II. The squadron was the first RAF unit to receive the Avro Aldershot, Handley Page Hyderabad, Handley Page Hinaidi, Vickers Wellington, Bristol Britannia and Boeing Globemaster. In case of the Avro Aldershot the squadron was its only operator, as it is now for the Globemasters.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 99 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington T2984-LN-B fallen to Molenbeersel on 4/07/1941
* Crash of Wellington T2957-LN-A fallen to Stekene on 31/07/1941

Back to the top

ligne

cest raf squadron

100 Squadron

The first RFC squadron to be formed specifically for night bombing, Number 100 Squadron formed at Hingham, Norfolk on 23 February 1917, and moved to France a month later. On arrival it was issued with modified FE2B two-seat pushers biplanes and operations against aerodromes, railway stations and rail junctions commenced. By the end of the year, No 100 in conjunction with No 55 Squadron, RFC and Naval 'A' Squadron had formed the nucleus of what was to become the Independent Force used for the strategic bombing of Germany with its Handley Page 0/400 heavy bombers.
After the War, the unit remained on the continent for a year before transferring to Baldonnel in Ireland and re-equipping with Bristol Fighters. These aircraft were used to support the Army and security forces in the fight against Sinn Fein in the Dublin area. With the division of the island in 1922, the Squadron returned to England and bombing duties, this time with Vimys and DH9As. By the turn of the decade, No 100 was undertaking torpedo-bombing and received Vildebeests in 1931, the squadron title being changed during 1933 to reflect this new role. At the end of that year, the unit moved to Singapore, and its ancient aircraft stood little chance of stopping the Japanese advance, and eventually the Squadron, and its sister Vildebeest unit, No 36, had been decimated.
On 15 December 1942, No 100 Squadron reformed at Waltham with Lancasters and commenced operations over Germany, surviving the post-war defence cuts and moving to Malaya to join Operation Firedog with its Lincolns during 1950. Four years later, No 100 moved to Kenya during the Mau Mau uprising, before returning to England and converting to the Canberra. The Canberras were used for trials work in conjunction with British nuclear tests in the Pacific, before disbanding again in 1959. Reformed at Wittering as part of the V-Force, the unit survived until September 1968 following withdrawal of the Blue Steel stand-off weapon. No 100 Squadron returned to Canberra flying when it was reformed at West Raynham in February 1972, this time to provide target towing facilities for RAF fighter squadrons, later undertaking specialist electronic warfare training before the Canberras were finally retired at the end of 1991 and replaced by the Hawk. With the closure of its base, RAF Wyton, the unit moved to Finningley, only to be forced to relocate to Leeming in 1995 when this station was closed down.
100 Squadron now operates in a mixed target facilities role along with exercise and training support which include WSO training, and dedicated aircraft to support the Joint Forward Air Controllers Training and Standards Unit. On the 2nd November 2010, 100 Squadron received a new Squadron Standard from Her Royal Highness, The Duchess of Cornwall, and Honorary Air Commodore to RAF Leeming
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 100 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster LL887-HW-H fallen on 23/04/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ME670-HW-O fallen to Brecht on 23/05/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ME677-HW-X fallen on 22/05/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ED553-HW-R fallen to Wommelgem on 17/06/1943
* Crash of Lancaster ND328-HW-W fallen to Sint-Martens-Voeren on 25/04/1944

Back to the top

ligne
ligne

Back to the top
"The Belgians Remember Them" - Rue Saint-Marcoult, 14 - B/7830 Silly, Belgique - Tel: +32/(0)68/286.466
Bank: BE97 0018 3886 3049 - BIC: GEBABEBB - Email: belgian.remember.them(at)gmail.com

Reproduction or distribution in any form of texts, lists and documents presented on this site is forbidden without the express authorization of the author
© Copyright "THE BELGIANS REMEMBER THEM" - 2017, all rights reserved - for all countries

Valid XHTML 1.0 Strict Logo Wilfred Burie Webmastering Compteur.fr analytics