The RAF Squadrons involved in WW2 in Belgium


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26 Squadron
33 Squadron
35 Squadron
41 Squadron
44 Squadron
49 Squadron
50 Squadron

cest raf squadron

1 Squadron



Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire AB317 fallen to Seraing on 28/08/1942
* Crash of Spitfire R6805 fallen to Soumagne on 3/05/1941

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4 Squadron

No. 4 Squadron formed at Farnborough in 1912 as part of the Royal Flying Corps. Operating a miscellaneous mixture of aircraft including early Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2s and Breguet biplanes, it quickly moved to Netheravon where it remained until the outbreak of the First World War.
No 4 Squadron reformed on 30 April 1920 at Farnborough, equipped with Bristol F.2 Fighters. Part of the squadron moved to Aldergrove near Belfast in November 1920 as a result of the Irish War of Independence, moving to Baldonnel Aerodrome near Dublin in May 1921, before rejoining the rest of the squadron at Farnborough in January 1922. The Squadron deployed on Royal Navy aircraft carriers when they sailed to Turkey on HMS Ark Royal and Argus during the Chanak crisis in August 1922, returning to Farnborough in September 1923. When the 1926 General Strike broke out, No. 4 Squadron's aircraft were used to patrol railway lines to deter feared sabotage.
In October 1929, the elderly Bristol Fighters were replaced with new Armstrong Whitworth Atlas aircraft, purpose-designed for the squadron's Army co-operation role, while these in turn were replaced by Hawker Audaxes in December 1931. In February 1937 it moved from Farnborough to RAF Odiham, soon re-equipping with the Hawker Hector, a more powerful derivative of the Audax. In January 1939, it discarded its Hector biplanes in favour of the new monoplane Westland Lysander
Shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, the squadron moved to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force. Following Germany's invasion of France and the Low Countries on 10 May 1940, 4 Squadron was frequently forced to change bases by the approach of the advancing German armies, being withdrawn to the UK on 24 May. Losses had been heavy, with 18 aircrew killed, while 60% of the groundcrew were lost. It continued in the coastal patrol and air-sea rescue role while training for its main Army co-operation role after returning to the UK.
In 1942 the Squadron changed its mission from the Army co-operation role, where it would operate fairly low-performance aircraft from airstrips close to the front-line, to that of fighter-reconnaissance, receiving the more modern Curtiss Tomahawk and North American Mustang, soon settling on the Mustang, flying low-level attack and reconnaissance flights against targets on the continent. In August 1943, it joined 2 Tactical Air Force in support of the planned invasion of Europe, changing to the pure reconnaissance mission in January, and replacing its Mustangs with Mosquito PR.XVI and Spitfire PR.XIs. It discarded its Mosquitoes in June, moved to France in August, and briefly supplemented its Spitfires with a few Hawker Typhoons for low-level reconnaissance. It retained its Spitfires at VE Day, moving to Celle in Germany to carry out survey operations in support of the British Army of Occupation until it was disbanded on 31 August 1945
The squadron reformed the next day by renumbering 605 Squadron, a light bomber squadron equipped with Mosquitoes based at Volkel in the Netherlands. It re-equipped with de Havilland Vampire fighter-bombers in July 1950, replacing them with North American Sabres in October 1953. The Sabres were discarded in favour of the Hawker Hunter in July 1955, retaining these until the squadron disbanded at RAF Jever on 31 December 1960.
Again, the squadron did not remain dormant for long, as it reformed on 1 January 1961 by renumbering No. 79 Squadron RAF, flying Hunter FR.10s in the low-level reconnaissance role. It re-equipped with the Hawker-Siddeley Harrier in 1970, first flying them from RAF Wildenrath in West Germany. It moved on to RAF Gütersloh in 1977.
The squadron operated the Harrier until the final withdrawal of the type, receiving numerous upgrades and new versions over the years. In April 1999, the squadron left Germany to move to RAF Cottesmore.
On 31 March 2010, No. 4 Squadron disbanded and reformed as No. 4 (Reserve) Squadron at RAF Wittering, taking over from No. 20 (R) Squadron as the Harrier Operational Conversion Unit. As a result of the 2010 Strategic Defence and Security Review, the squadron disbanded in January 2011, only to reform on 24 November 2011, when No. 19 (R) Squadron, operating the BAE Hawk T2 from RAF Valley in the tactical weapons training role, was renumbered.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the 4 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lysander P.9063 fallen to Hoegaerde on 13/05/1940


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7 Squadron

Formation and early years
No. 7 Squadron was formed at Farnborough Airfield on 1 May 1914 as the last squadron of the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) to be formed before the First World War, but has been disbanded and reformed several times since, the first being after only three months of existence, the latter as early as 28 September 1914. The squadron spent most of the First World War in observation and interception roles and was responsible for the first ever interception of an enemy aircraft over Britain.
It deployed to France in April 1915, flying Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.5s for reconnaissance and Vickers Gunbuses as escort fighters. Captain John Aidan Liddell of 7 Squadron won the Victoria Cross for his actions on 31 July 1915, when he continued his reconnaissance mission over Belgium after the aircraft was hit by ground fire, the aircraft being badly damaged and Liddell suffering a broken thigh. Although he successfully recovered the R.E.5 to allied lines, saving his observer, he died of his wounds a month later.[7][8]
The squadron re-equipped with B.E.2s in 1916, which it used for both bombing and reconnaissance during the Battle of the Somme that year. The B.E.2s were replaced by R.E.8s in July 1917, continuing in the reconnaissance role for the rest of the war, operating over Ypres in the summer and autumn of 1917 and in support of Belgium forces in the closing months of the war. It disbanded at the end of 1919.

To Bomber Command
It re-formed at RAF Bircham Newton on 1 June 1923 with the Vickers Vimy as a night heavy bomber squadron, continuing in this role with a succession of types through the inter-war period. It started to receive the Vickers Virginia bomber on 22 May 1924, being the first RAF Squadron to operate Virginias,[12] although it did not dispose of the last of its Vimys until April 1927. In 1927 it moved to RAF Worthy Down, commanded by Charles Portal, later to become Chief of the Air Staff during the Second World War.[11] In 1932, Frederick Higginson, who became a fighter ace in the Second World War, was assigned as a mechanic-gunner to the squadron.
The squadron gained a reputation as being one of the leading RAF heavy bomber squadrons, winning the Lawrence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy six times between 1927 and 1933 and shared in 1934 with 54 Squadron in 1934, achieving an average bombing error of 40 yards (37 m). By this time, the elderly Virginia was obsolete, and in April 1935 they were replaced by the more modern Handley Page Heyford, which it won the Lawrence Minot trophy yet again in 1935. Part of the squadron was split off in October 1935 to form No. 102 Squadron, while the remainder moved to RAF Finningley in September 1936. In April 1937 the squadron received four Vickers Wellesleys to equip a flight which was again split off to form 76 Squadron.
In March 1938 it replaced its Heyford biplanes with Armstrong Whitworth Whitley monoplanes. It re-equipped again in April 1939, with Handley Page Hampdens bombers replacing the Whitleys. In June 1939 it became a training unit, preparing crews for the Hampden equipped 5 Group.

Second World War
7 Squadron Stirling "S for Sugar" at RAF Oakington
On the outbreak of the Second World War, it continued to be used for training bomber crews, disbanding on 4 April 1940 when it merged with 76 Squadron to form No. 16 OTU. On 1 August 1940 it reformed, becoming the first squadron to equip with the new Short Stirling heavy bomber, the first RAF squadron to operate four engined bombers during the Second World War, flying the first bombing raids with the Stirling against oil storage tanks near Rotterdam on the night of 10/11 February 1941.[7][19] It flew on the 1000 bomber raids to Cologne, Essen and Bremen in May and June 1942.[11] It was transferred to the Pathfinder Force in August 1942, with the job of finding and marking targets for the Main Force of Bomber Command bombers.[7] It re-equipped with the Avro Lancaster from 11 May 1943,[20] flying its first mission with the Lancaster on 12 July 1943.[21] It continued in the Pathfinder role until the end of the war in Europe. It flew its last bomber mission on 25 April 1945 against Wangerooge, and dropped food to starving civilians in the Netherlands in May. While it was planned to fly 7 Squadron out to the Far East to join Tiger Force for air attacks against Japan, the war ended before the squadron was due to move.[22]
The squadron carried out 5,060 operational sorties with the loss of 165 aircraft.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the 7 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Stirling ED366-MG-L fallen to Achel on 22/06/1943
* Crash of Stirling W7520-MC-S fallen to Brustem on 20/05/1942
* Crash of Stirling BK760-MG-X fallen to Tongerlo on 1104/1943
*
*

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9 Squadron

After its initial formation at St Omer, France on 8 Dec 1914 by renaming the Wireless Flight of the RFC Headquarters, No. 9 Sqn was disbanded in March 1915 when its various elements were absorbed into other RFC Squadrons. Reformed a month later at Brooklands, the Squadron then joined the effort in France with its BE2Cs on reconnaissance and bombing tasks and subsequently with RE8s. Like many other Squadrons, it was disbanded in 1919 after a brief period in occupied Germany.
It wasn't until 1 April 1924 that it was reformed, this time with Vickers Vimy night bombers at Upavon before moving to Manston where the hangars could accommodate the aircraft. In January 1925, the squadron received the first in a long line of Virginia heavy bombers which were followed by Heyfords in 1936.
In February 1939, the Squadron moved to Honington received Wellingtons, and it was with these that it was involved in anti-shipping sorties in the early stages of World War II. These were replaced in turn by the famous Lancaster bomber in September 1942 and the unit became part of Bomber Command's strategic offensive against German targets and was now based at Waddington. Following a move to nearby Bardney, No. 9 Sqn specialised in dropping large bombs and the 12,000lb (5,440kg) 'Tallboy' in particular. During the attack on the Dortmund-Ems canal in January 1945, the Lancaster of Fg Off H Denton was hit and caught fire. The Squadron also took part in the successful mission to sink the German battleship Tirpitz in 1944.
After the War, Lincolns replaced the Lancasters until 1952, when the Squadron took charge of Canberra jet-bombers. These aircraft were used during three-months of operations in Malaya in 1956, and then in the Suez crisis. In March 1962, the Squadron became part of the V-Force when flying Vulcans and spent six years in Cyprus as part of the Near East Air Force before another disbandment in April 1982. Four months later No. 9 Sqn was reformed as the first RAF Tornado squadron at Honington, and in 1986 moved to of Bruggen in Germany until its closure. It is now at RAF Marham in Norfolk from where it deployed to the Gulf in 2003 to take part in Operation Telic, the UK's contribution to Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the 9 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington T2505-WS-S fallen on 28/09/1940
* Crash of Wellington X3469-WS fallen to Retie on 31/05/1942
* Crash of Lancaster ED487-WS-D fallen to Voorst on 17/06/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LM430-WS-B fallen to Lembeek on 23/03/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ND951-WS-Z fallen to Wilsele on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Wellington BJ876-WS fallen to Neeroesteren on 1/08/1942
*


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10 Squadron

No. 10 Sqn was formed from elements of No. 1 Reserve Squadron at Farnborough on 1 January, 1915 with the customary selection of types. In July, the Squadron moved to St Omer, France and a month later began spotting duties with its BE2Cs for the Indian Corps during the Battle of Loos. The Squadron's next major action was during the Battle of Arras in April 1917 when it also carried out some bombing sorties. After the Armistice, No. 10 Squadron spent a short period in Germany prior to returning to the UK and its inevitable disbandment came at the end of 1919.
It reformed in January 1928 as a heavy bomber unit at Upper Heyford equipped with Hyderabads, and during the 1930s a succession of biplane bomber types were flown, including Hinaidis, Virginias and Heyfords. In January 1937, the Squadron moved to Dishforth and shortly after that received its first monoplane bomber, the Whitley.
During the early months of World War 2, the Squadron carried out leaflet-dropping raids over Germany. The more modern Halifax arrived in late 1941, and these stayed with 10 Squadron throughout the remainder of the War as part of Bomber Command's heavy bomber force. In May 1945, the Squadron transferred to Transport Command and received Dakotas, spending a short time in India before disbanding again in December 1947 only to reform a year later. During the Berlin Airlift, No. 10 flew Dakotas from Lubeck, but was again disbanded after the blockade was lifted.
A four-year period of Canberra operations in the mid-1950s saw the unit involved in operations during the Suez Crisis. Another spell as a bomber Squadron followed when during 1958-64 it flew Victors from Cottesmore, before assuming its current guise as one of the RAF's long-range transport squadrons after taking charge of the first of the new VC10s at RAF Fairford in July 1966. It moved to its current base at Brize Norton in May of the following year and since then, No. 10 Sqn has been involved in almost all of the UK's major operations and recently became a dual tanker/transport squadron when its aircraft were fitted with air-to-air refuelling pods.
In October 2005, 10 Squadron disbanded at RAF Brize Norton and its aircraft transferred to No 101 Squadron.
A formal Reformation Parade for 10 Squadron is planned for 2012 at RAF Brize Norton as it becomes the first RAF Squadron to fly the new Voyager aircraft, due into service at the end of 2011.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the 10 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax HX347-ZA-Q fallen to Eppegem on 2/05/1944
* Crash of Whitley T4231-ZA-A fallen to Koersel on 26/07/1941
* Crash of Whitley Z6586-ZA-F fallen to Martenslinde on 17/08/1941
* Crash of Whitley Z6564-ZA-Z fallen to Rekem on 19/08/1941
* Crash of Mosquito MM792 fallen in Venlo (NL) on 22/03/1945
* Crash of Halifax MZ574-ZA-W fallen Swier (NL) on 23/09/1944
* Crash of Whitley Z6672-ZA fallen to Riemst on 19/08/1941



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12 Squadron

No. 12 Squadron was formed on 14 February 1915 at Netheravon from a nucleus of crew and aircraft provided by No. 1 Squadron. In April 1916, the Squadron moved to St Omer, France equipped with BE2Cs primarily in the long-range reconnaissance role. By April 1918, No. 12 Squadron had added night bombing and strafing to its repertoire. After the Armistice, the Squadron moved to Germany as part of the Army of Occupation and by November 1919 was the sole operational squadron in Germany until July 1922 when it was disbanded. The Squadron reformed in April 1923 with DH9As spending a short time at Northolt before moving to Andover where it became engaged in the development of bombing techniques. It was during this time that the squadron received the designation 12(B) squadron, for Bomber, to denote its primary mission. In 1926, the Squadron became the sole operator of the Fairey Fox, an aircraft that outpaced many contemporary fighters and revolutionised bomber tactics.
In 1935, flying Hawker Harts, the Squadron moved to Aden in response to the Italian invasion of Abyssinia. They returned home in 1936 and re-equipped with Hinds. At the start of World War II, No. 12 Squadron departed for France as part of the Advanced Air Striking Force equipped with Fairey Battles. In May 1940, Fg Off Garland and Sgt Gray, his observer, led a flight of aircraft in an attack on a vital bridge over the Albert Canal. All of the aircraft were shot down by fierce enemy ground fire, but one end of the bridge was destroyed and both Garland and Gray were posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, the first of the war for the RAF. After the British withdrawal from France in June 1940, the Squadron began night attacks on enemy shipping and re-equipped with Wellingtons. Two years later, Lancasters were taken on strength and these lasted until August 1946, when Lincolns replaced them.
During 1952, No. 12 Squadron received Canberra jet-bombers, and these were used in support of Operations Firedog (Malaya) and Musketeer (Suez). In July 1961, the Squadron was disbanded but reformed a year later at Coningsby with Vulcans, in which they won the 1964 US Strategic Air Command bombing competition and completed several around-the-world flights. The Squadron once again disbanded in late 1967 before reforming again in October 1969 with Buccaneers.
After a period of relative stability performing the maritime strike mission, No. 12 Squadron moved to Lossiemouth from Honington in 1980. In January 1991, No. 12 Squadron was hastily deployed to the Persian Gulf to support strike operations with the Pave-Spike pod, providing an airborne laser designator for the RAF's Paveway Laser Guided Bombs dropped from Tornado GR1s. In 1993 Tornado GR1Bs replaced the squadrons Buccaneers, though the squadron continued in the maritime strike role until 1998. During December 1998, the Squadron took part in Operation Desert Fox, the four-day air campaign against Iraq. Deployments to the Gulf continued, flying the upgraded Tornado GR4 from 2001 and included major contributions in 2003 as part of Operation Telic as well as supporting the first free elections in Iraq for 50 years in January 2005.
In 2006 and again in 2008 the Sqn provided armed overwatch for UK and US ground operations in Iraq. Shortly afterwards, as British troops withdrew from the country, the Tornado fleet based in the region also returned to the UK, marking the end of a long era of the aircraft in theatre. At this time it was announced that the Tornado GR4 was to replace the Harrier in Afghanistan. Specifically, 12(B) Sqn were asked to be the first GR4 Sqn in theatre, so after several delays resulting in an extended work-up period, in Jun 2009 the Sqn trailed 10 jets to Cyprus, 8 of which continued to Kandahar. For over 4 months they successfully provided support to the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), including Close Air Support for, amongst others, British, American, Canadian and Afghan troops in all parts of the country. On the 16th Oct 2009 12(B) Sqn returned to Lossiemouth after having handed over to a Marham-based GR4 sqn.
Between subsequent Op HERRICK Deployments during 2011, 12(Bomber) Squadron was deployed in support Operation ELLAMY. Op ELLAMY was the codename for the UK’s participation in the military intervention in Libya under United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973 which stipulated that "all necessary measures" shall be taken to protect civilians. This saw 10 aircrew deploy to Gioia del Colle to bolster the Tornado component during the peak of operations. The remainder of the Squadron was held at readiness to move to RAF Marham to launch Storm Shadow raids on hardened Libyan targets. These missions required three air-to-air refueling brackets on the outward journey and one further on return to Gioia Del Colle.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the 12 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster ND715-PH-R fallen to Postel on 23/04/1944
* Crash of Battle I P2204 fallen to Eigenbilzen on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Wellington Z8533-PH-V fallen to Molenbeersel on 3/06/1942
* Crash of Lancaster ED629-PK-H fallen to Neerpelt on 17/06/1943
* Crash of Battle L5227-PH-J fallen to Veldwezelt on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Wellington BJ606-PH-S fallen to Wintershoven on 15/10/1942



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13 Squadron

No 13 Squadron was formed at Gosport on 10 January 1915, taking its BE2Cs across the Channel in October, initially employed on corps reconnaissance duties. In April 1917, RE8s replaced the BE2s and these played a major role in the battles of Arras and Cambrai. When hostilities ceased, the Squadron remained in France, before returning to the UK in 1919 and disbanding. Reformed at Kenley in April 1924, the Squadron resumed its army co-operation role with Bristol Fighters and played a major role in developing co-operation between land and air forces. Atlas', Audaxes and Hectors were subsequently used, before Lysanders arrived in 1939.
As part of the BEF in France during the early part of World War II, No. 13 Squadron carried out tactical reconnaissance missions, before returning, a much depleted force in May 1940. The following year was spent on anti-submarine and anti-invasion patrols before Blenheims arrived and the Squadron returned to army co-operation duties. During 1942, the Squadron provided diversionary attacks for the 1,000 bomber raids. By the end of the year, No. 13 Squadron had moved to North Africa, supporting the First Army throughout its victorious campaign.
During the allied invasion of Italy, the Squadron was tasked with shipping protection. After the War, the Squadron was disbanded briefly before reforming in Palestine with reconnaissance Mosquitos. In 1952, Meteors arrived, and later moved to Akrotiri, Cyprus. In 1957, the Squadron began a long association with Canberras and moved to Malta in 1965. As the RAF withdrew from its Middle East bases in the late 1960s, No. 13 remained in Malta until transferring to Wyton in 1978, continuing to fly Canberras until disbanded in 1982. No. 13 squadron reformed with the new Tornado GR1A at Honington on 1 January 1990, and moved to RAF Marham, some four years later. 13 Squadron disbanded on 1 June 2011 and stood up at RAF Waddington on 26th October 2012 as the first UK based Reaper Squadron.The squadron undertook its first sortie on 24 April 2013.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the 13 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim T2254-A fallen to Aartselaar on 26/06/1942
* Crash of Blenheim Z6084 fallen to Houwaart 26/06/1942



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15 Squadron

Formed as a training unit at Farnborough on 1 March 1915, No. 15 Squadron crossed to France in December of that year equipped with BE2Cs for corps-reconnaissance duties. One unusual task the unit undertook was the dropping of ammunition by parachute to troops on the front line during 1918. After the War, the squadron succumbed to the inevitable disbandment. The Squadron reformed at Martlesham Heath in March 1924, but it was little more than in name, as their aircraft were part of the A&AEE trial fleet. This arrangement continued until 1934 when the squadron was reformed at Abingdon with Hawker Harts. It was shortly after this, that on the insistence of its Commanding Officer, Squadron Leader TW Elmhirst DFC, that the Squadron became known as XV Squadron.
During 1938, the Squadron was one of the first to receive Battles, and it was with these that XV Squadron flew to France in September 1939. In early 1940, the Squadron returned to the UK and re-equipped with Blenheims flown in the ground attack role. By the turn of the year, these had been traded in for Wellingtons, and shortly after that XV Squadron became one of the first Stirling heavy-bomber units. One famous aircraft flown by XV Squadron was named 'MacRobert's Reply', an aircraft donated by Lady MacRobert in memory of her three sons killed in RAF service. Lancasters arrived during 1943, and the Squadron remained part of No. 1 Group's main force for the remainder of the war.
Other heavy bombers were flown in the shape of Lincolns and Washingtons, but in 1953, XV Squadron moved into the jet age with Canberras. During the Suez crisis, the Squadron dropped more bombs than any other Canberra unit, but was disbanded in 1957. In September 1958, the Squadron reformed at Cottesmore as the second Victor squadron, but six years later was again disbanded.
On 01 October 1970, the Sqn was reformed at Honington, before moving to Laarbruch in January 1971. After the Gulf War, three Tornado Squadrons at Laarbruch were disbanded, XV Squadron being one of these, at the end of 1991. On 1 April 1992, the XV (Reserve) numberplate was given to the Tornado Weapons Conversion Unit at Honington. XV(R) Squadron remained at Honington training Tornado aircrew until November 1993, when it moved to Lossiemouth, its present home.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster LL752-LS-A fallen to Leuven on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Blenheim 8849-LS fallen to Beverst on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim P6912-LS-O fallen to Genk on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Stirling BF448-LS-T fallen to Helchteren on 14/02/1943
* Crash of Stirling BK694-LS-C fallen to Lommel on 29/06/1943
* Crew of Blenheim P6911-LS fallen to Munsterbilzen on 12/05/1940

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16 Squadron

No. 16 Squadron was formed from elements of Nos. 2, 5 and 6 Squadrons at St Omer, France, on 10 February 1915. The unit flew more than its fair share of types including Voisins, BE2As, Bs, and Shorthorns, using them to pioneer the use of wireless to report enemy troop movements during the Battle of Abuers Ridge in May 1915. During 1916, the Squadron standardised on the BE2C. During the Battle of Vimy Ridge, the Squadron formed an association with the Canadian Corps that lasted until the Armistice. Along with so many other RAF Squadrons, No. 16 was disbanded in 1919. On 1 April 1924, No. 16 Squadron reformed at Old Sarum, spending the next ten years attached to the School of Army Co-operation flying Bristol Fighters, Atlas' and Audaxes. In May 1938, the Squadron became the first to receive Lysanders, taking them to France at the outbreak of World War II.
After returning to the UK in May 1940, the Squadron was tasked with anti-invasion coastal patrols until Mustangs arrived in April 1942. These were used in 'Rhubarb' patrols over France and also intercepting enemy fighter-bombers mounting 'hit and run' raids along the South Coast. During the preparations for D-Day, reconnaissance Spitfires replaced the Mustangs, flying both high- and low-level reconnaissance sorties as 2TAF advanced towards Germany.
In March 1946, after a period of confusion as to whether the Squadron had been disbanded or not, the Squadron inherited No. 56 Squadron's Tempests and moved to Gutersloh. No. 16 Squadron re-equipped with ground-attack Vampires in late 1948 and Venoms in 1954 before disbanding in June 1957. A year later, the Squadron was reformed at Laarbruch and began a 14-year association with Canberras before finally receiving Buccaneers in June 1972. The Buccaneers were replaced by Tornado GR1s in 1984, and, like its sister Squadron, No. XV, found itself disbanded in Germany in October 1991 under 'Options for Change' and its numberplate being assigned to an operational conversion unit, in this case No. 226 OCU at Lossiemouth.
With the decision taken to run the Jaguar fleet down in anticipation of the arrival of its replacement, the Typhoon, No 16 was disbanded at RAF Coltishall on 11 March 2005.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire PA947 fallen to Rijkevorsel on 01/10/1944


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21 Squadron



Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington HE110-SJ-Q fallen to Spalbeek on 17/09/1942

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26 OTU Squadron



Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington HX375-X fallen to Kordekenshoef on 2/06/1942


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33 Squadron

No. 33 Squadron was formed at Filton on 12 January 1916 from personnel left behind by No. 12 Squadron when it departed for France. After its work-up period, the Squadron moved to Yorkshire and took up Home Defence duties with its BE2Cs. The main task was countering enemy airship raids on towns and cities in the North Midlands. For the remainder of the War, the Squadron continued this task, employing FE2B and 'Ds, Bristol F2Bs and Avro 504s, but, despite many interceptions, could not claim any successes.
After disbanding in June 1919, the Squadron did not reform until 1929, this time as a day bomber unit equipped briefly with Hawker Horsleys, but soon replaced by Harts. In 1935, the Squadron moved to Egypt during the Abyssinian crisis, and remained in the Middle East when the conflict was over. Shortly after however, the unit took up air policing duties over Palestine where Arabs had begun attacking Jewish settlements. With the outbreak of World War II, No. 33 moved to the Western Desert, active action beginning with the entry of Italy into the War in June of 1940. Conversion to ground attack Hurricanes was completed some six months later. Following the disastrous defence of Greece in 1941, the Squadron returned to the Western Desert before returning to the UK in April 1944 and receiving Spitfires. By the end of the year, No 33 had traded these in for Tempests and these were used on fighter sweep tasks until the end of the War.
With the cessation of hostilities, the unit remained in Germany until July 1949 when it was transferred to the Far East to undertake ground attack missions against Communist guerrillas in Malaya. The faithful Tempests were exchanged for Hornets in 1951, these continuing until the Squadron was disbanded briefly in 1955. In the following years, the Squadron found itself in a state of flux with several short-lived reformations until March 1965 when it reformed as a Bloodhound surface-to-air missile unit in Malaya. In 1970, the unit again disbanded, only to reappear the following year at Odiham as the RAF's first Puma squadron. The unit has taken part in several major RAF operations, most noticeably the Gulf War of 1991, and Operation Agricola, the Kosovo peacekeeping force. During the 1990's, the Squadron moved to RAF Benson, its current home. The squadron has been busy since, taking part in Operation Barwood in Mozambique, providing helicopter support to NATO forces in Bosnia and most recently taking part in operations in Iraq during Operation TELIC. On return from operations in Iraq in 2009, the Squadron was joined by No 230 Squadron at RAF Benson to co-locate the Puma Force. The most recent focus of the Squadron was the essential pre-deployment training for Land Forces for Operation HERRICK including Exercises GRAND PRIX and ASKARI THUNDER in Kenya. The Sqn is now equipped with Puma HC2 helicopters which have been upgraded to cope with the intense heat and higher altitudes that current operations demand, which could see the Puma Force deploying operationally again very shortly.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire NH318 fallen to Wommelgem on 17/09/1944


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35 Squadron

No.35 Squadron went through two incarnations during the Second World War. At the start of the war it was equipped with the Fairey Battle, but unlike most Battle units was not sent to France, instead acting as a training unit, equipped with a mix of Battles, Ansons and Blenheims. The squadron was combined with No. 207 Squadron, first to form No.1 Group Pool on 1 October 1939 and then to form No. 17 Operational Training Unit on 8 April 1940.
The second incarnation began on 5 November 1940. The new No. 35 was the first squadron to use the Handley Page Halifax. A detachment from the squadron had been training on the prototype Halifaxes, and began to work with the first production aircraft in November 1940. The squadron carried out the first Halifax raid on 10 March 1941. In August 1942 the squadron was transferred to the new Pathfinder Force (No. 8 Group), remaining with that unit until the end of the war. In March 1944 the squadron converted to the Avro Lancaster.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the 35 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax HR833-TL-F fallen to Hoogstraten on 30/05/1943 * Crash of Halifax HX270-TL-M fallen to Sint-Truiden on 20/12/1943
* Crash of Halifax W7701-TL-U fallen to Molenbeersel on 8/06/1942
* Crash of Halifax HR673-TL-B fallen to Riemst on 04/07/1944
* Crash of Halifax DT804-TL-C fallen to Sint-Truiden on 30/05/1943
* Crash of Halifax HR812-TL-F fallen to Wandre on 29/06/1943
¨* Crash of Halifax W1050-TL-F fallen to Saint-Hubert on 7/05/1942


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41 Squadron

No.41 Squadron operated the Supermarine Spitfire for the entire duration of the Second World War, taking part in the fighting over Dunkirk, the Battle of Britain, flying sweeps over occupied France before moving to Europe to join the Second Tactical Air Force.
In September 1939 the squadron was based at Catterick, North Yorkshire. After a brief move to Wick in October, the squadron remained at Catterick until May 1940, flying defensive patrols over the north of England.
In May 1940 the squadron moved to Hornchurch, and took part in the fighting over Dunkirk, the first time that the Luftwaffe encountered the Spitfire in large numbers. The squadron remained in the south during the first part of the Battle of Britain, briefly resting at Catterick from 8 August-3 September, before returning to Hornchurch for the final phase of the battle.
In the summer of 1941 the RAF began to "lean over the channel", flying sweeps over France in the hope that the Luftwaffe would respond. No.41 Squadron was involved in these sweeps from July 1941-August 1942, often operating under the same disadvantages as the Germans had during the battle of Britain. A relative rest came between August 1942 and April 1943, when the squadron flew patrols over the Irish Sea, but in April 1943 the squadron returned to the south of England, and would remain in the front line for the rest of the war.
For a year from April 1943 to April 1944 the squadron flew a mixture of missions, flying defensive patrols against low level German fighter bomber attacks, conducting shipping reconnaissance and providing bomber escorts to the limit of the Spitfire's range. From April-June 1944 the squadron moved to the south west, and flew sweeps over Brittany. It was then moved back to the south east in June to take part in the campaign against the V-1. From August-October this was combined with a mix of fighter sweeps and bomber escort duties.
On 5 October 1944 the squadron became part of the Second Tactical Air Force, and in December moved to Belgium at part of No.125 Wing. From then until the end of the war the squadron flew armed reconnaissance missions behind the German front lines, attacking any suitable targets they encountered. The squadron remained in Germany after the war, until on 1 April 1946 the wartime squadron was renumbered as No.26 Squadron, while the old No.122 Squadron became No.41.

Crash in witch the 41 squadron was involved:
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

Crash of Spitfire EN622 fallen to Neerhespen on 3/09/1944


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44 Squadron

No. 44 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Hainault Farm, Essex, on 24th July 1917, as a Home Defence Squadron and gained fame in the First World War by pioneering the use of the Sopwith Camel single-seat fighter aircraft for night operations (August/September 1917) and achieving the first unqualified victory in combat between aircraft flying at night (two Camels versus a German Gotha, 28/29th January 1918). One of the squadron's early commanding officers was Major AT Harris who, as Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Harris, was to direct the greatest aerial assault in history on the German homeland a quarter of a century later.
Disbanded in 1919, No.44 was re-formed at Wyton in March 1937, as a bomber squadron with Hawker Hinds, moving later in the year to Waddington, where it re-equipped with Blenheims and then Hampdens.
Commanded at the outbreak of the Second World War by Wing Commander JN Boothman of Schneider Trophy fame, the squadron's early operations consisted mainly of North Sea sweeps, security patrols and minelaying. There followed raids on land communications, on Hitler's concentrations of invasion barges in the Channel and North Sea ports, on Luftwaffe airfields and naval targets, as well as the first raids on German industrial centres.
In September 1941, the squadron's title was altered to "No. 44 (Rhodesia) Squadron" in recognition of that country's generous donations to the war effort. This was particularly appropriate as about a quarter of the squadron's personnel were Rhodesian. The association is preserved in the squadron's badge which features an African elephant.
In December 1941, the squadron's Hampdens were withdrawn and early in 1942 No.44 became the first squadron to convert completely to Lancasters. It quickly made this aircraft's vastly increased striking power felt by the enemy. In a memorable low-level unescorted daylight raid on the MAN Diesel factory at Augsburg in Southern Bavaria on 17th April, Squadron Leader JD Nettleton, leading a combined force with No.97 Squadron, won the VC. For a brief period No.44 enjoyed the distinction of having on its strength two recipients of the supreme award for valour, since the CO at this period was Wing Commander RAB Learoyd VC.
Pressure on the enemy steadily increased. Not only did No. 44 Squadron throw all its weight into Bomber Command's relentless assault on German industry, but it also raided ports and U-boat shelters, as well as the Peenemunde V-weapons experimental station and targets in Northern Italy.
As the war approached its climax, with the Allied invasion of Europe, No.44 Squadron played its part in the disruption of communications in France, in the bombing of enemy coastal defences and semi-tactical support of the ground forces, before turning its attention to V1 launching sites in the Pas de Calais. Concentration now turned to starving the enemy of his oil supplies and wrecking his transport system, coupled with the reduction of hostile garrisons in the path of our armies.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Hampden P2121-KM to Antwerpen (Burcht) on 17/09/1940
* Crash of Lancaster ND552-KM-X fallen to Eisden on 22/06/1944
* Crash of Lancaster W4838-KM-B fallen to Genk on 30/05/1943
* Crash of Lancaster ME804-KM-O fallen to Genk on 22/06/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LM434-KM-P fallen to Lanklaar on 22/06/1944


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49 Squadron

No.49 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Dover, Kent, on 15th April 1916, and in November 1917, went to France as a day-bombing squadron equipped with DH4s. It arrived in France in time to take part in the Battle of Cambrai and made its first raid on 26th November. No opposition was encountered on this occasion but three days later the squadron ran into the Richthofen "Circus". The fighting was severe but No. 49 lost only one aircraft.
The ordinary routine of day bombing continued until March, but during the German offensive the squadron did a good deal of low bombing to check the enemy's advance. In April, following a move up to Dunkirk, No.49 was re-equipped with DH9s and with these raided such places as Ostend, Thourout, Zeebrugge and Bruges. Eventually the squadron moved south again and in June, from Fourneuil, near Beauvais, it was engaged in intensive low-flying attacks on ground targets as well as long- distance bombing raids. In one week, from 10th to 17th June, it shot down seventeen enemy aircraft.
In July the squadron moved south to the French front, where attacks were made on enemy communications, but it returned to the British front in August in anticipation of a counter- offensive on the Somme front and once more it was detailed for low bombing. This work so depleted the squadron in both aircraft and personnel that Nos. 49 and 27 Squadrons had to join forces and go over the lines in one formation. Until the Armistice the squadron was thereafter engaged in high-altitude day bombing in the face of intensive opposition. Many successful raids were made on important objectives, and many enemy aircraft were destroyed.
In May 1919, the squadron was posted to Germany as part of the Army of Occupation. Post-war disarmament led to its disbandment in July of that year, however, and not until 1936 was it re-formed at Bircham Newton, as a bomber squadron with Hawker Hinds. When war came again No.49 was flying Hampdens from Scampton, Lincolnshire, and in April 1940, helped inaugurate the RAF's sea-mining campaign. Soon afterwards it began to drop bombs as well as mines, and in August 1940, one of the squadron's pilots, Flight Lieutenant RAB Learoyd, won the first Bomber Command VC for his part in a joint low-level attack by Nos. 49 and 83 Squadrons on the Dortmund-Ems Canal.
In 1942 No.49 Squadron converted to Manchesters, then Lancasters, and in October led No.5 Group's epic dusk attack on the Schneider armament and locomotive works at Le Creusot. In 1943 the squadron took part in the first "shuttle-bombing" raid (when the targets were Friedrichshafen and Spezia), and the famous raid on Peenemunde. Among the targets which it attacked during 1944 were the coastal gun battery at La Pernelle on the Normandy coast, and the V1 storage sites in the caves at St. Leu d'Esserent on the River Loire, some 30 miles north-west of Paris. In December 1944, it took part in a raid on the German Baltic Fleet at Gdynia and in March 1945, was represented in the bomber force which so pulverised the defences of Wesel just before the crossing of the Rhine that Commandos were able to seize the town with only 36 casualties.
Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the 49 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster ED663-EA fallen to Grobbendonk on 9/07/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LL899-EA-P fallen to Hennxbroek on 11/04/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ME808-EA-D fallen to Loenhout on 22/06/1944
* Crash of Lancaster R5763-EA fallen to Abee on 3/09/1942



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50 Squadron

No. 50 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Dover, Kent, on 15th May 1916, as a Home Defence squadron. The squadron first went into action in August 1916 against a German airship raid and was instrumental in driving one of the airships (the Zeppelin L.ll) out to sea. In a daylight aeroplane raid eleven months later, one of the attacking Gothas was shot down off the North Foreland by a pilot of No. 50 Squadron. At the time of the Armistice No. 50 was based at Bekesbourne and it was there that the unit was eventually disbanded in June 1919.
Re-formed in May 1937, as a bomber squadron, No. 50 was flying Hampdens from Waddington at the outbreak of the Second World War and first dropped bombs in anger in March 1940, when it participated in Bomber Command's first attack on a German land target - the mine-laying seaplane base at Hornum on the island of Sylt. In December 1940, by which time it had attacked many other enemy targets, including Berlin, the squadron took part in the first area-bombing attack on a German industrial centre (Mannheim). A year later, to the month, it took part in the Combined Operation against the German-held Norwegian island of Vaagsõ, its Hampdens - operating from an advanced base in Northern Scotland - dropping smoke bombs to provide a smoke screen for troops and landing craft, and also bombing a gun battery.
In 1942 No. 50 Squadron converted to Manchesters, then to Lancasters, and in October of that year contributed twelve Lancasters to No. 5 Group's celebrated low-Ievel dusk raid on the Schneider works at Le Creusot. In 1943 it took part in the first shuttle-bombing raid (when the targets were a radar factory at Friedrichshafen and the Italian naval base at Spezia), and the epic raid on the German V-weapons experimental establishment at Peenemunde. Among the targets that it attacked in 1944 were the V1 storage sites in the caves at St. Leu d'Esserent in the Loire valley, and the dykes at Flushing on the German-held Dutch island of Walcheren. In December 1944, it took part in a raid on the German Baltic Fleet at Gdynia, and in March 1945, was represented in the bomber force that so pulverised the defences of Wesel just before the crossing of the Rhine that Commandos were able to seize the town with only 36 casualties. In April 1945, came the last of the squadron's operations against the enemy - an attack on an oil refinery at Vallo (Tonsberg) in Norway

Crash in witch the 50 squadron was involved:


Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax ED810-VN Fallen to Ekeren on 15/06/1943
* Crash of Lancaster ED488-VN-N fallen to Hamont-Achel on 2/02/1943
* Crash of Lancaster NE135-VN-F fallen to Bas-Oha on 13/08/1944

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Squadron



Sources: Wikipedia

Crash in witch the squadron was involved:




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