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The RAF Squadrons involved in WW2 in Belgium


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23 Squadron
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26 Squadron
27 Squadron
33 Squadron
35 Squadron
38 Squadron
40 Squadron
41 Squadron
44 Squadron
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50 Squadron

cest raf squadron

1 Squadron

... On the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939 the squadron was deployed to France as part of the RAF Advanced Air Striking Force.
In October it flew over enemy territory for the first time and soon claimed its first victory, shooting down a Dornier Do 17 on 31 October. Further successes were made during the Phoney War, until the Battle of France erupted in May 1940. Within a week the squadron was bombed out of its base at Berry-au-Bac, north-west of Paris.
A series of retreats followed, ending only when the squadron evacuated from France on 18 June, with a return to Tangmere on 23 June. (The autobiographical book Fighter Pilot by Paul Richey, a pilot with 1 Squadron during the Battle of France, is widely regarded as a classic of air warfare literature.)
In August 1940 the squadron entered the Battle of Britain and was heavily engaged until 9 September, when the squadron was transferred to 12 Group was sent to RAF Wittering to refit, rest and recuperate...
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 1 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire AB317 fallen to Seraing on 28/08/1942
* Crash of Spitfire R6805 fallen to Soumagne on 3/05/1941
* Crash of Hurricane ? fallen to unknown spot of crash on 19/05/1940
* Crash of
* Crash of
* Crash of

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3 Squadron


For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Typhoon JP733 fallen to Doornzele on 5/10/1943
* Crash of Typhoon JP911 fallen to Mendonk on 5/10/1943
* Crash of
* Crash of
* Crash of

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4 Squadron

No. 4 Squadron formed at Farnborough in 1912 as part of the Royal Flying Corps. Operating a miscellaneous mixture of aircraft including early Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2s and Breguet biplanes, it quickly moved to Netheravon where it remained until the outbreak of the First World War.
No 4 Squadron reformed on 30 April 1920 at Farnborough, equipped with Bristol F.2 Fighters. Part of the squadron moved to Aldergrove near Belfast in November 1920 as a result of the Irish War of Independence, moving to Baldonnel Aerodrome near Dublin in May 1921, before rejoining the rest of the squadron at Farnborough in January 1922. The Squadron deployed on Royal Navy aircraft carriers when they sailed to Turkey on HMS Ark Royal and Argus during the Chanak crisis in August 1922, returning to Farnborough in September 1923. When the 1926 General Strike broke out, No. 4 Squadron's aircraft were used to patrol railway lines to deter feared sabotage.
In October 1929, the elderly Bristol Fighters were replaced with new Armstrong Whitworth Atlas aircraft, purpose-designed for the squadron's Army co-operation role, while these in turn were replaced by Hawker Audaxes in December 1931. In February 1937 it moved from Farnborough to RAF Odiham, soon re-equipping with the Hawker Hector, a more powerful derivative of the Audax. In January 1939, it discarded its Hector biplanes in favour of the new monoplane Westland Lysander
Shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, the squadron moved to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force. Following Germany's invasion of France and the Low Countries on 10 May 1940, 4 Squadron was frequently forced to change bases by the approach of the advancing German armies, being withdrawn to the UK on 24 May. Losses had been heavy, with 18 aircrew killed, while 60% of the groundcrew were lost. It continued in the coastal patrol and air-sea rescue role while training for its main Army co-operation role after returning to the UK.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 4 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lysander P.9063 fallen to Hoegaerde on 13/05/1940
* Crash of Lysander N1298 fallen to Bruyelle on 21/05/1940
* Crash of Lysander N1263 fallen to Outer on 18/05/1940
* Crash of
* Crash of
* Crash of

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7 Squadron

7 Squadron Stirling "S for Sugar" at RAF Oakington
On the outbreak of the Second World War, it continued to be used for training bomber crews, disbanding on 4 April 1940 when it merged with 76 Squadron to form No. 16 OTU. On 1 August 1940 it reformed, becoming the first squadron to equip with the new Short Stirling heavy bomber, the first RAF squadron to operate four engined bombers during the Second World War, flying the first bombing raids with the Stirling against oil storage tanks near Rotterdam on the night of 10/11 February 1941.[7][19] It flew on the 1000 bomber raids to Cologne, Essen and Bremen in May and June 1942.[11] It was transferred to the Pathfinder Force in August 1942, with the job of finding and marking targets for the Main Force of Bomber Command bombers.[7] It re-equipped with the Avro Lancaster from 11 May 1943,[20] flying its first mission with the Lancaster on 12 July 1943.[21] It continued in the Pathfinder role until the end of the war in Europe. It flew its last bomber mission on 25 April 1945 against Wangerooge, and dropped food to starving civilians in the Netherlands in May. While it was planned to fly 7 Squadron out to the Far East to join Tiger Force for air attacks against Japan, the war ended before the squadron was due to move.[22]
The squadron carried out 5,060 operational sorties with the loss of 165 aircraft...
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 7 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Stirling ED366-MG-L fallen to Achel on 22/06/1943
* Crash of Stirling W7520-MC-S fallen to Brustem on 20/05/1942
* Crash of Stirling BK760-MG-X fallen to Tongerlo on 1104/1943
* Crash of Stirling R9259-MG-J fallen to Sauvenière on 6/12/1942
* Crash of Stirling W7616-MG-C fallen to Walcourt on 24/08/1942
* Crash of Lancaster JB455-MG-N fallen to Anzegem on 16/06/1944
* Crash of
* Crash of

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9 Squadron

After its initial formation at St Omer, France on 8 Dec 1914 by renaming the Wireless Flight of the RFC Headquarters, No. 9 Sqn was disbanded in March 1915 when its various elements were absorbed into other RFC Squadrons. Reformed a month later at Brooklands, the Squadron then joined the effort in France with its BE2Cs on reconnaissance and bombing tasks and subsequently with RE8s. Like many other Squadrons, it was disbanded in 1919 after a brief period in occupied Germany.
It wasn't until 1 April 1924 that it was reformed, this time with Vickers Vimy night bombers at Upavon before moving to Manston where the hangars could accommodate the aircraft. In January 1925, the squadron received the first in a long line of Virginia heavy bombers which were followed by Heyfords in 1936.
In February 1939, the Squadron moved to Honington received Wellingtons, and it was with these that it was involved in anti-shipping sorties in the early stages of World War II. These were replaced in turn by the famous Lancaster bomber in September 1942 and the unit became part of Bomber Command's strategic offensive against German targets and was now based at Waddington. Following a move to nearby Bardney, No. 9 Sqn specialised in dropping large bombs and the 12,000lb (5,440kg) 'Tallboy' in particular. During the attack on the Dortmund-Ems canal in January 1945, the Lancaster of Fg Off H Denton was hit and caught fire. The Squadron also took part in the successful mission to sink the German battleship Tirpitz in 1944.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 9 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington T2505-WS-S fallen on 28/09/1940
* Crash of Wellington X3469-WS fallen to Retie on 31/05/1942
* Crash of Lancaster ED487-WS-D fallen to Voorst on 17/06/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LM430-WS-B fallen to Lembeek on 23/03/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ND951-WS-Z fallen to Wilsele on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Wellington BJ876-WS fallen to Neeroesteren on 1/08/1942
* Crash of Wellington R1758-WS fallen to Blankenberge on 9/06/1941
* Crash of Lancaster PD205-WS-H fallen to Kortrijk on 21/07/1944
* Crash of Typhoon JP514 fallen to Menen-Menin on 5/10/1943
* Crash of Wellington R3220-WS fallen to Oostende on 7/12/1940
* Crash of
* Crash of
* Crash of

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10 Squadron

No. 10 Sqn was formed from elements of No. 1 Reserve Squadron at Farnborough on 1 January, 1915 with the customary selection of types. In July, the Squadron moved to St Omer, France and a month later began spotting duties with its BE2Cs for the Indian Corps during the Battle of Loos. The Squadron's next major action was during the Battle of Arras in April 1917 when it also carried out some bombing sorties. After the Armistice, No. 10 Squadron spent a short period in Germany prior to returning to the UK and its inevitable disbandment came at the end of 1919.
It reformed in January 1928 as a heavy bomber unit at Upper Heyford equipped with Hyderabads, and during the 1930s a succession of biplane bomber types were flown, including Hinaidis, Virginias and Heyfords. In January 1937, the Squadron moved to Dishforth and shortly after that received its first monoplane bomber, the Whitley.
During the early months of World War 2, the Squadron carried out leaflet-dropping raids over Germany. The more modern Halifax arrived in late 1941, and these stayed with 10 Squadron throughout the remainder of the War as part of Bomber Command's heavy bomber force. In May 1945, the Squadron transferred to Transport Command and received Dakotas, spending a short time in India before disbanding again in December 1947 only to reform a year later. During the Berlin Airlift, No. 10 flew Dakotas from Lubeck, but was again disbanded after the blockade was lifted.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 10 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax HX347-ZA-Q fallen to Eppegem on 2/05/1944
* Crash of Whitley T4231-ZA-A fallen to Koersel on 26/07/1941
* Crash of Whitley Z6586-ZA-F fallen to Martenslinde on 17/08/1941
* Crash of Whitley Z6564-ZA-Z fallen to Rekem on 19/08/1941
* Crash of Mosquito MM792 fallen in Venlo (NL) on 22/03/1945
* Crash of Halifax MZ574-ZA-W fallen Swier (NL) on 23/09/1944
* Crash of Whitley Z6672-ZA fallen to Riemst on 19/08/1941
* Crash of Halifax HX295-ZA-A fallen to Hastière on 27/03/1944
* Crash of Halifax JD368-ZA-A fallen to Haulchin on 28/08/1943


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12 Squadron

No. 12 Squadron was formed on 14 February 1915 at Netheravon from a nucleus of crew and aircraft provided by No. 1 Squadron. In April 1916, the Squadron moved to St Omer, France equipped with BE2Cs primarily in the long-range reconnaissance role. By April 1918, No. 12 Squadron had added night bombing and strafing to its repertoire. After the Armistice, the Squadron moved to Germany as part of the Army of Occupation and by November 1919 was the sole operational squadron in Germany until July 1922 when it was disbanded. The Squadron reformed in April 1923 with DH9As spending a short time at Northolt before moving to Andover where it became engaged in the development of bombing techniques. It was during this time that the squadron received the designation 12(B) squadron, for Bomber, to denote its primary mission. In 1926, the Squadron became the sole operator of the Fairey Fox, an aircraft that outpaced many contemporary fighters and revolutionised bomber tactics.
In 1935, flying Hawker Harts, the Squadron moved to Aden in response to the Italian invasion of Abyssinia. They returned home in 1936 and re-equipped with Hinds. At the start of World War II, No. 12 Squadron departed for France as part of the Advanced Air Striking Force equipped with Fairey Battles. In May 1940, Fg Off Garland and Sgt Gray, his observer, led a flight of aircraft in an attack on a vital bridge over the Albert Canal. All of the aircraft were shot down by fierce enemy ground fire, but one end of the bridge was destroyed and both Garland and Gray were posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, the first of the war for the RAF. After the British withdrawal from France in June 1940, the Squadron began night attacks on enemy shipping and re-equipped with Wellingtons. Two years later, Lancasters were taken on strength and these lasted until August 1946, when Lincolns replaced them.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 12 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster ND715-PH-R fallen to Postel on 23/04/1944
* Crash of Battle I P2204 fallen to Eigenbilzen on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Wellington Z8533-PH-V fallen to Molenbeersel on 3/06/1942
* Crash of Lancaster ED629-PK-H fallen to Neerpelt on 17/06/1943
* Crash of Battle L5227-PH-J fallen to Veldwezelt on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Wellington BJ606-PH-S fallen to Wintershoven on 15/10/1942



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13 Squadron

No 13 Squadron was formed at Gosport on 10 January 1915, taking its BE2Cs across the Channel in October, initially employed on corps reconnaissance duties. In April 1917, RE8s replaced the BE2s and these played a major role in the battles of Arras and Cambrai. When hostilities ceased, the Squadron remained in France, before returning to the UK in 1919 and disbanding. Reformed at Kenley in April 1924, the Squadron resumed its army co-operation role with Bristol Fighters and played a major role in developing co-operation between land and air forces. Atlas', Audaxes and Hectors were subsequently used, before Lysanders arrived in 1939.
As part of the BEF in France during the early part of World War II, No. 13 Squadron carried out tactical reconnaissance missions, before returning, a much depleted force in May 1940. The following year was spent on anti-submarine and anti-invasion patrols before Blenheims arrived and the Squadron returned to army co-operation duties. During 1942, the Squadron provided diversionary attacks for the 1,000 bomber raids. By the end of the year, No. 13 Squadron had moved to North Africa, supporting the First Army throughout its victorious campaign.
During the allied invasion of Italy, the Squadron was tasked with shipping protection. After the War, the Squadron was disbanded briefly before reforming in Palestine with reconnaissance Mosquitos. In 1952, Meteors arrived, and later moved to Akrotiri, Cyprus. In 1957, the Squadron began a long association with Canberras and moved to Malta in 1965. As the RAF withdrew from its Middle East bases in the late 1960s, No. 13 remained in Malta until transferring to Wyton in 1978, continuing to fly Canberras until disbanded in 1982. No. 13 squadron reformed with the new Tornado GR1A at Honington on 1 January 1990, and moved to RAF Marham, some four years later. 13 Squadron disbanded on 1 June 2011 and stood up at RAF Waddington on 26th October 2012 as the first UK based Reaper Squadron.The squadron undertook its first sortie on 24 April 2013.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 13 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim T2254-A fallen to Aartselaar on 26/06/1942
* Crash of Blenheim Z6084 fallen to Houwaart 26/06/1942



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14 Squadron


For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 14 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Hampden P1185-GL-B fallen to Middelkerke on 1/08/1942


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15 Squadron

Formed as a training unit at Farnborough on 1 March 1915, No. 15 Squadron crossed to France in December of that year equipped with BE2Cs for corps-reconnaissance duties. One unusual task the unit undertook was the dropping of ammunition by parachute to troops on the front line during 1918. After the War, the squadron succumbed to the inevitable disbandment. The Squadron reformed at Martlesham Heath in March 1924, but it was little more than in name, as their aircraft were part of the A&AEE trial fleet. This arrangement continued until 1934 when the squadron was reformed at Abingdon with Hawker Harts. It was shortly after this, that on the insistence of its Commanding Officer, Squadron Leader TW Elmhirst DFC, that the Squadron became known as XV Squadron.
During 1938, the Squadron was one of the first to receive Battles, and it was with these that XV Squadron flew to France in September 1939. In early 1940, the Squadron returned to the UK and re-equipped with Blenheims flown in the ground attack role. By the turn of the year, these had been traded in for Wellingtons, and shortly after that XV Squadron became one of the first Stirling heavy-bomber units. One famous aircraft flown by XV Squadron was named 'MacRobert's Reply', an aircraft donated by Lady MacRobert in memory of her three sons killed in RAF service. Lancasters arrived during 1943, and the Squadron remained part of No. 1 Group's main force for the remainder of the war.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster LL752-LS-A fallen to Leuven on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Blenheim 8849-LS fallen to Beverst on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim P6912-LS-O fallen to Genk on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Stirling BF448-LS-T fallen to Helchteren on 14/02/1943
* Crash of Stirling BK694-LS-C fallen to Lommel on 29/06/1943
* Crash of Blenheim P6911-LS fallen to Munsterbilzen on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Stirling BF460-LS-F fallen to Doische on 11/08/1943
* Crash of Stirling N6047-LS-P fallen to Mariembourg on 13/10/1941
* Crash of Wellington R1791-EO-D fallen to Marchienne on 31/05/1942
* Crash of Stirling BF329-LS-A fallen to Philippeville on 13/08/1942
* Crash of Stirling BK815-LS-V fallen to Melsele on 22/06/1943
* Crash of Blenheim R3896-LS fallen to Brugge on 7/07/1940



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16 Squadron

No. 16 Squadron was formed from elements of Nos. 2, 5 and 6 Squadrons at St Omer, France, on 10 February 1915. The unit flew more than its fair share of types including Voisins, BE2As, Bs, and Shorthorns, using them to pioneer the use of wireless to report enemy troop movements during the Battle of Abuers Ridge in May 1915. During 1916, the Squadron standardised on the BE2C. During the Battle of Vimy Ridge, the Squadron formed an association with the Canadian Corps that lasted until the Armistice. Along with so many other RAF Squadrons, No. 16 was disbanded in 1919. On 1 April 1924, No. 16 Squadron reformed at Old Sarum, spending the next ten years attached to the School of Army Co-operation flying Bristol Fighters, Atlas' and Audaxes. In May 1938, the Squadron became the first to receive Lysanders, taking them to France at the outbreak of World War II.
After returning to the UK in May 1940, the Squadron was tasked with anti-invasion coastal patrols until Mustangs arrived in April 1942. These were used in 'Rhubarb' patrols over France and also intercepting enemy fighter-bombers mounting 'hit and run' raids along the South Coast. During the preparations for D-Day, reconnaissance Spitfires replaced the Mustangs, flying both high- and low-level reconnaissance sorties as 2TAF advanced towards Germany.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 16 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire PA947 fallen to Rijkevorsel on 01/10/1944


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21 Squadron

It was 3 December 1935 before the squadron reformed, which happened at Bircham Newton. The squadron was a light bomber unit equipped with Hinds, which it replaced with Blenheims in August 1938. In the early part of WW2, the squadron operated against targets in Holland and Belgium but in June 1940, it moved to Lossiemouth, from where it undertook anti-shipping operations. It returned to East Anglia in October but in December was sent to Malta, where it carried out anti-shipping missions until disbanding on 14 March 1942.
At Bodney on the same day, a new No 21 formed, taking over the Blenheims of No 82 Squadron. Two months later Venturas arrived followed by a lengthy work-up delaying the squadron's first operation with the new aircraft taking place on 6 December 1942. This involved 17 aircraft being sent on the famous daylight attack on the Philips Electronics factory at Eindhoven. It was a case of being equipped with an unsuitable type again and in September 1943 the squadron re-equipped with the Mosquito. At the same time it began to operate in the night bombing role as well as carrying out daylight missions occasionally. As Allied troops moved towards Germany many squadrons moved onto the continent and No 21 was one of these in February 1945, from where it continued to undertake intruder operations. It remained in Germany after the war, disbanding at Gutersloh on7 November 1947.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 21 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington HE110-SJ-Q fallen to Spalbeek on 17/09/1942
Wellington W5618-UH-W fallen to Moustier on 2/06/1942
* Crash of Blenheim L8734-Y-H fallen to Moorsele on 25/05/1940


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23 Squadron

At the start of the war the squadron was equipped with the Blenheim IF, and it retained this barely adequate night fighter for the next year and a half. From the start of the war until December 1940 the squadron was used as a defensive night fighter squadron, although as its Blenheims were not yet equipped with radar they had very few successes.
The Blenheim was better suited for the night intruder mission, and on the night of 21-22 December six Blenheim's IFs of No.23 Squadron took part in the first night of Operation Intruder, attacking German bomber bases in Normandy. For the next two years the squadron would operate as an intruder squadron, attacking German targets in occupied Europe. During this period the Blenheim was replaced by the Havoc and then the Boston III, before in July 1942 the first Mosquito NF.Mk IIs arrived.
In December 1942 the squadron was transferred to Malta, to fly intruder missions over Sicily, Italy and Tunisia. In December 1943, with the Allied armies in Italy, No.23 Squadron moved to Sardinia, and expanded its range of operations to include northern Italy and the south of France.
In May 1944 the squadron returned to Britain, and on 1 June it joined No.100 Group. This was the group dedicated to supporting Bomber Command's heavy bombers over Germany. For the rest of the war No.23 Squadron flew night intruder missions, mostly over Germany, aimed at disrupting the German night fighter defences.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 23 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Mosquito HR236-YP fallen in Germany on 24/07/1944

* Crash of
* Crash of
* Crash of

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24 Squadron

After flying a variety of single-engined types since its formation, No 24 received its first real transport in March, 1935, a D.H.89A, supplemented by a D.H.86 in October, 1937. It was intended to equip the squadron with 20 Mentors as standard equipment but the war overtook this plan and No. 24 began its wartime career with a wide variety of aircraft of civil design, including Rapides taken over from civil airlines which were later impressed. For the first nine months of the war, communications and mail flying between the U.K. and France was a major task but after June, 1940, flying was confined to the U.K. with the exception of a few special flights.In April, 1942, the squadron was transferred to Ferry Command, the predecessor of Transport Command and in the same month began flights to Malta with passengers and mail.
In April, 1943, a flight of Dakotas was added and in May the first York was put into service for V.I.P. use. As the Allied armies liberated more of Europe, the extent of overseas flights increased and in October, 1944, the squadron was reorganised; in place of the collection of transport types, the Dakota became the standard equipment of the squadron, with a flight of Ansons for short range work.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 24 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Whitley BD347 fallen to Fleurus on 1/08/1942

* Crash of
* Crash of
* Crash of

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26 Squadron

No.26 Squadron began the Second World War as an army co-operation squadron equipped with the Westland Lysander. At the start of the war it took its Lysanders to France, where most of the Lysander squadrons suffered very heavy loses. No.26 Squadron would appear to have returned from France relatively intact, which would explain why while most Lysander squadrons were dispersed around Britain No.26 Squadron remained on active duty on the south coast. While the fighting continued in France the squadron was used for a mix of reconnaissance, bombing and supply missions. After the fall of France the squadron flew coastal patrols, especially over the potential German invasion ports.
On 18 August a German air raid destroyed three of the remaining Lysanders on the ground. Two weeks later the squadron moved to Gatwick, where it performed ack-ack calibration and balloon spotting duties.
This period ended with the arrival of the Tomahawk in February 1941. After a period of training, in October 1941 the squadron began to fly low-level daylight intruder missions over northern France, but the Tomahawk lacked the performance for this duty, and in January 1942 was joined by the Mustang I, a superb aircraft at low level. The squadron flew intruder missions and reconnaissance missions with its Mustangs until July 1943, when it was moved to Yorkshire...
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 26 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington HX375-X fallen to Kordekenshoef on 2/06/1942
* Crash of
* Crash of
* Crash of


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27 Squadron

27 Squadron formed at Hounslow Heath Aerodrome on 5 November 1915, soon being equipped with Martinsyde Elephant fighter aircraft, hence the use of an elephant for the squadron badge. It transferred to France early in 1916, but although initially using their aircraft as escort fighters, by the time the Battle of the Somme began, it was clear that the Elephant was unsuitable as a fighter, and the Squadron switched to a bomber-reconnaissance role, taking advantage of the Martinsyde's good range and load carrying capacity,carrying out its first bombing mission on 1 July 1916.
It re-equipped with Airco DH.4s, which carried twice the bombload of the Martinsyde at greater speed and height, while carrying a gunner to defend against enemy fighters, from between September and November 1917, flying missions in support of the British offensive at Cambrai, and low level missions against the attacking German troops during the Spring Offensive of 1918. It started to receive DH.9 bombers in July 1918, but as these proved to be inferior to the DH.4, managed to keep some of its DH.4s until the end of the war. The squadron was disbanded on 22 January 1920...
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 27 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington Z8901 fallen to Sautour on 27/04/1942
* Crash of
* Crash of
* Crash of

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33 Squadron

No. 33 Squadron was formed at Filton on 12 January 1916 from personnel left behind by No. 12 Squadron when it departed for France. After its work-up period, the Squadron moved to Yorkshire and took up Home Defence duties with its BE2Cs. The main task was countering enemy airship raids on towns and cities in the North Midlands. For the remainder of the War, the Squadron continued this task, employing FE2B and 'Ds, Bristol F2Bs and Avro 504s, but, despite many interceptions, could not claim any successes.
After disbanding in June 1919, the Squadron did not reform until 1929, this time as a day bomber unit equipped briefly with Hawker Horsleys, but soon replaced by Harts. In 1935, the Squadron moved to Egypt during the Abyssinian crisis, and remained in the Middle East when the conflict was over. Shortly after however, the unit took up air policing duties over Palestine where Arabs had begun attacking Jewish settlements. With the outbreak of World War II, No. 33 moved to the Western Desert, active action beginning with the entry of Italy into the War in June of 1940. Conversion to ground attack Hurricanes was completed some six months later. Following the disastrous defence of Greece in 1941, the Squadron returned to the Western Desert before returning to the UK in April 1944 and receiving Spitfires. By the end of the year, No 33 had traded these in for Tempests and these were used on fighter sweep tasks until the end of the War.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 33 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire NH318 fallen to Wommelgem on 17/09/1944


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35 Squadron

No.35 Squadron went through two incarnations during the Second World War. At the start of the war it was equipped with the Fairey Battle, but unlike most Battle units was not sent to France, instead acting as a training unit, equipped with a mix of Battles, Ansons and Blenheims. The squadron was combined with No. 207 Squadron, first to form No.1 Group Pool on 1 October 1939 and then to form No. 17 Operational Training Unit on 8 April 1940.
The second incarnation began on 5 November 1940. The new No. 35 was the first squadron to use the Handley Page Halifax. A detachment from the squadron had been training on the prototype Halifaxes, and began to work with the first production aircraft in November 1940. The squadron carried out the first Halifax raid on 10 March 1941. In August 1942 the squadron was transferred to the new Pathfinder Force (No. 8 Group), remaining with that unit until the end of the war. In March 1944 the squadron converted to the Avro Lancaster.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 35 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax HR833-TL-F fallen to Hoogstraten on 30/05/1943 * Crash of Halifax HX270-TL-M fallen to Sint-Truiden on 20/12/1943
* Crash of Halifax W7701-TL-U fallen to Molenbeersel on 8/06/1942
* Crash of Halifax HR673-TL-B fallen to Riemst on 04/07/1944
* Crash of Halifax DT804-TL-C fallen to Sint-Truiden on 30/05/1943
* Crash of Halifax HR812-TL-F fallen to Wandre on 29/06/1943
¨* Crash of Halifax W1050-TL-F fallen to Saint-Hubert on 7/05/1942
* Crash of Halifax L9572-TL-G fallen to Chièvres on 25/08/1941
* Crash of Lancaster ME620-TL-C fallen to Estinnes on 9/05/1944



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38 Squadron


For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 38 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington ?-HD-R fallen to Oostende on 11/09/1940


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40 Squadron

... No. 40 operated Bristol Blenheim Mk IV light bombers from RAF Wyton from December 1939 until November 1940, when it converted to Vickers Wellingtons in the night bombing role. On the 14 April 1940 one of the Squadrons Blenheims (L9207) was taken on an unauthorized flight by AC2 JFB Lewis and crashed in the Thames Estuary. His body was not found and he is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial. After operating a detachment in Malta from October 1941, the squadron moved there in February 1942, the remaining UK-based element being renumbered No. 156 Squadron RAF.
It later moved to Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and then, in December 1943, to Italy. They participated in the successful Allied invasion of Sicily, concluding in August 1943. The Squadron re-equipped with Consolidated Liberators in March 1945...
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 40 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington X9619-BL-M fallen to Dinant on 12/10/1941
* Crash of >Blenheim N6217 fallen to Ecaussinnes on 15/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim P4913 fallen to Ecaussinnes on 15/05/1940
* Crash of Wellington R1406-BL-C fallen to Sint-Laureins on 27/06/1941
* Crash of Wellington X9749-BL-J fallen to Handzame on 26/08/1941
* Crash of

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41 Squadron

No.41 Squadron operated the Supermarine Spitfire for the entire duration of the Second World War, taking part in the fighting over Dunkirk, the Battle of Britain, flying sweeps over occupied France before moving to Europe to join the Second Tactical Air Force.
In September 1939 the squadron was based at Catterick, North Yorkshire. After a brief move to Wick in October, the squadron remained at Catterick until May 1940, flying defensive patrols over the north of England.
In May 1940 the squadron moved to Hornchurch, and took part in the fighting over Dunkirk, the first time that the Luftwaffe encountered the Spitfire in large numbers. The squadron remained in the south during the first part of the Battle of Britain, briefly resting at Catterick from 8 August-3 September, before returning to Hornchurch for the final phase of the battle.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the squadron was involved:

Crash of Spitfire EN622 fallen to Neerhespen on 3/09/1944


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44 Squadron

... Commanded at the outbreak of the Second World War by Wing Commander JN Boothman of Schneider Trophy fame, the squadron's early operations consisted mainly of North Sea sweeps, security patrols and minelaying. There followed raids on land communications, on Hitler's concentrations of invasion barges in the Channel and North Sea ports, on Luftwaffe airfields and naval targets, as well as the first raids on German industrial centres.
In September 1941, the squadron's title was altered to "No. 44 (Rhodesia) Squadron" in recognition of that country's generous donations to the war effort. This was particularly appropriate as about a quarter of the squadron's personnel were Rhodesian. The association is preserved in the squadron's badge which features an African elephant.
In December 1941, the squadron's Hampdens were withdrawn and early in 1942 No.44 became the first squadron to convert completely to Lancasters. It quickly made this aircraft's vastly increased striking power felt by the enemy. In a memorable low-level unescorted daylight raid on the MAN Diesel factory at Augsburg in Southern Bavaria on 17th April, Squadron Leader JD Nettleton, leading a combined force with No.97 Squadron, won the VC. For a brief period No.44 enjoyed the distinction of having on its strength two recipients of the supreme award for valour, since the CO at this period was Wing Commander RAB Learoyd VC.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the squadron was involved:

* Crash of Hampden P2121-KM to Antwerpen (Burcht) on 17/09/1940
* Crash of Lancaster ND552-KM-X fallen to Eisden on 22/06/1944
* Crash of Lancaster W4838-KM-B fallen to Genk on 30/05/1943
* Crash of Lancaster ME804-KM-O fallen to Genk on 22/06/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LM434-KM-P fallen to Lanklaar on 22/06/1944
* Crash of Lancaster W4105-KM-X fallen to Feluy on 24/08/1942
* Crash of Hampden AD975-KM fallen to Waasmunster on 14/10/1940
* Crash of
* Crash of

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49 Squadron

In May 1919, the squadron was posted to Germany as part of the Army of Occupation. Post-war disarmament led to its disbandment in July of that year, however, and not until 1936 was it re-formed at Bircham Newton, as a bomber squadron with Hawker Hinds. When war came again No.49 was flying Hampdens from Scampton, Lincolnshire, and in April 1940, helped inaugurate the RAF's sea-mining campaign. Soon afterwards it began to drop bombs as well as mines, and in August 1940, one of the squadron's pilots, Flight Lieutenant RAB Learoyd, won the first Bomber Command VC for his part in a joint low-level attack by Nos. 49 and 83 Squadrons on the Dortmund-Ems Canal.
In 1942 No.49 Squadron converted to Manchesters, then Lancasters, and in October led No.5 Group's epic dusk attack on the Schneider armament and locomotive works at Le Creusot. In 1943 the squadron took part in the first "shuttle-bombing" raid (when the targets were Friedrichshafen and Spezia), and the famous raid on Peenemunde. Among the targets which it attacked during 1944 were the coastal gun battery at La Pernelle on the Normandy coast, and the V1 storage sites in the caves at St. Leu d'Esserent on the River Loire, some 30 miles north-west of Paris. In December 1944, it took part in a raid on the German Baltic Fleet at Gdynia and in March 1945, was represented in the bomber force which so pulverised the defences of Wesel just before the crossing of the Rhine that Commandos were able to seize the town with only 36 casualties.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 49 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster ED663-EA fallen to Grobbendonk on 9/07/1943
* Crash of Lancaster LL899-EA-P fallen to Hennxbroek on 11/04/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ME808-EA-D fallen to Loenhout on 22/06/1944
* Crash of Lancaster R5763-EA fallen to Abee on 3/09/1942
* Crash of Hamptden AT156-EA-C fallen to Philippeville on 6/04/1942
* Crash of Hampden P1318 fallen off coast on 25/05/1940




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50 Squadron

... Re-formed in May 1937, as a bomber squadron, No. 50 was flying Hampdens from Waddington at the outbreak of the Second World War and first dropped bombs in anger in March 1940, when it participated in Bomber Command's first attack on a German land target - the mine-laying seaplane base at Hornum on the island of Sylt. In December 1940, by which time it had attacked many other enemy targets, including Berlin, the squadron took part in the first area-bombing attack on a German industrial centre (Mannheim). A year later, to the month, it took part in the Combined Operation against the German-held Norwegian island of Vaagsõ, its Hampdens - operating from an advanced base in Northern Scotland - dropping smoke bombs to provide a smoke screen for troops and landing craft, and also bombing a gun battery.
In 1942 No. 50 Squadron converted to Manchesters, then to Lancasters, and in October of that year contributed twelve Lancasters to No. 5 Group's celebrated low-Ievel dusk raid on the Schneider works at Le Creusot. In 1943 it took part in the first shuttle-bombing raid (when the targets were a radar factory at Friedrichshafen and the Italian naval base at Spezia), and the epic raid on the German V-weapons experimental establishment at Peenemunde. Among the targets that it attacked in 1944 were the V1 storage sites in the caves at St. Leu d'Esserent in the Loire valley, and the dykes at Flushing on the German-held Dutch island of Walcheren. In December 1944, it took part in a raid on the German Baltic Fleet at Gdynia, and in March 1945, was represented in the bomber force that so pulverised the defences of Wesel just before the crossing of the Rhine that Commandos were able to seize the town with only 36 casualties. In April 1945, came the last of the squadron's operations against the enemy - an attack on an oil refinery at Vallo (Tonsberg) in Norway
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in whichthe 50 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax ED810-VN Fallen to Ekeren on 15/06/1943
* Crash of Lancaster ED488-VN-N fallen to Hamont-Achel on 2/02/1943
* Crash of Lancaster NE135-VN-F fallen to Bas-Oha on 13/08/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ME441-VN-W fallen in Germany on 21/03/1945
* Crash of Lancaster R5728-VN-L fallen to Braine-le-Comte on 30/07/1942
<* Crash of Lancaster LM429-VN-C fallen to Oostvleteren on 11/05/1944
* Crash of
* Crash of

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Squadron



For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the squadron was involved:



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